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Health and Safety Essay Sample

Health and Safety Pages
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For this assignment I have been asked to explain possible priorities and responses when dealing with two particular incidents or emergencies in a health or social care setting. I have also been asked to discuss health, safety or security concerns arising from a specific incident or emergency in a health or social care setting. As well as this I will justify responses to a particular incident or emergency in a health or social care setting. The Recovery Position

A service user has collapsed outside the hospital; they are unconscious however they are still breathing. I have therefore taken the decision to put them into the Recovery Position. I have done this as it will make sure that their airways remain clear and open. It also makes sure that any vomit or fluid will not make them choke. I will now describe step by step on how to put someone into the Recovery Position. Before doing anything you would pause for a second before going over to help. The reason being, you would be assessing the scene to check for any dangers for both you and the casualty, the hazards that you would be looking for is in case a car could come round the corner and hit both you and the casualty. Once you feel comfortable with the surroundings, you would move on to the next step. With the recovery position, your main priority is to ensure that you are safe and that there are no dangers that can affect you or compromise the care of your patient.

The first thing that you would do is kneel on the floor on one side of the person and gently tap them, you would then introduce yourself and ask them are they ok. You must always ensure that you have help on the way, so you would need to phone 999, or if you have no phone present, shout for help and ask a by stander to ring 999. Before placing them in the recovery position you should remove anything that could be harmful to the service user or make them uncomfortable. When removing belongings, tell and show someone else what you are removing and where you are placing it. This is so that things cannot get lost, and you have verification of what you have removed. You should open their airway by gently tilting their head back and lifting their chin, this to check that there is nothing there to block their airways. You would then place the arm nearest you at a right angle to their body with their hand upwards towards the head. Then tuck their other hand under the side of their head, so that the back of their hand is touching their cheek.

This is where removing any jewellery would benefit the service user, as if they had say for example a big chunky ring on their finger, this could dig into their face and cause them to feel uncomfortable. Next you would bend the knee farthest from you to a right angle and roll the person onto their side carefully by pulling on the bent knee. The top arm should be supporting the head and the bottom arm will stop you rolling them too far. Throughout all of this, you should always remember to approach the casualty with a calm and reassuring tone as well as confidence even if you are not, as it can cause disruption and/or concern to your casualty or any individual with them. You should constantly talk to your casualty when they are in the recovery position, as hearing is the last to go. You should stay with the person and monitor their breathing and pulse continuously until help arrives.

When help does arrive, you should tell the paramedics everything that you have done, including any mistakes that you may have made. This is because due to something you may have done it could cause more damage to the casualty. For example; they may have a spinal injury and with you putting them into the recovery position you could cause there spinal injury to be more damaging. If the casualties injuries allow you to, you should try to turn the person onto their other side after about 30 minutes if no help has arrived. I would be putting the person into the recovery position as I would be adhering to health and safety policies in work. Once the casualty is in safe hands, you should ensure that for future safety you remember to document everything.

CPR
One of the residents in the Care Home has went into cardiac arrest. I have therefore taken the decision to administer CPR to the resident to try and make them stable again. Chest compressions and rescue breaths keep blood and oxygen circulating in the body. Before doing anything you would assess the area for any dangers or hazards, for example there is a lead lying beside the casualty. Therefore you would ask someone to move it out of the way to stop any harm coming to either you or the service user. You would then phone 999 straight away to ask for an ambulance. Once you know help is on the way, you can start CPR straight away. You should only administer CPR if you feel confident enough to do so. You would start by placing the heel of your hand on the centre of the person’s chest, then place the other hand on the top and press down by 5-6cm at a steady pace. You should do at least 30 chest compressions, before giving two breaths. Whilst giving chest compressions, you need to be careful that you do not lean to hard or go down to far, as this could cause you to crack the casualties ribs. When you are doing chest compressions, you are trying to help the individual’s heart keep pumping blood around the body.

Once you are moving onto the rescue breaths, you should tilt the casualties head gently and lift the chin up with two fingers. You do not throw the casualties head back as this could cause them to break their neck. You tilt the head back, to clear the airways. If you see something in their mouth that they could choke on you must remove it, however if it is for example; a tongue bar, you would not remove this as it is not going to obstruct the airways, and it would take too much time to remove it. Once their head is tilted back, you would pinch the person’s nose, and seal your mouth over their mouth and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth. When doing this you should check that their chest rises as this will tell you if you are being successful. You give two rescue breaths and continue with another 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until help arrives. Due to chest compressions being very tiring, you could ask someone that is with you to do the chest compressions whilst you do the rescue breaths, and take it in turns.

This will give the casualty a better chance of coming around. If the casualty does begin to breathe again, you would then do ahead and put them into the recovery position that we have talked about previously. Again with CPR your main priority is to ensure that you are safe and that there are no dangers that can affect you or compromise the care of your patient. When doing CPR, and the persons loved one or relative is watching, that could cause further problems in health and emotional well-being. Therefore a colleague would remove them from the room. You must always ensure that help is on the way. You should still continue to talk to the person throughout, telling them what you are doing and reassuring them that they are going to be ok, hearing is the last thing to go, therefore hearing you reassure them could put the casualty at ease as they know that they have someone that knows what they are doing working with them.

When paramedics arrive, you should inform them of everything that you have done, including any mistakes that may have occurred, as this could be a matter of life and death. Again you may have done something that could cause more damage to the casualty, you may have pressed too hard whilst doing the compressions and cracked a rib. You should always remember to fill out the appropriate paper work once the incident is dealt with, as if anything in the future happens, you are able to show them exactly what happened and what you did as this will keep you and the company right. Conclusion

I have explained possible priorities and responses when dealing with two particular incidents or emergencies in a health or social care setting. I have also discussed health, safety or security concerns arising from a specific incident or emergency in a health or social care setting. As well as this I justified responses to a particular incident or emergency in a health or social care setting.

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