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Civil Engineer Essay Sample

Civil Engineer Pages
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Civil engineering is a professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built environment, including works like roads, bridges, canals, dams, and buildings.[1][2][3] Civil engineering is the oldest engineering discipline after military engineering,[4] and it was defined to distinguish non-military engineering from military engineering.[5] It is traditionally broken into several sub-disciplines including environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, geophysics, geodesy, control engineering, structural engineering, biomechanics,nanotechnology, transportation engineering, earth science, atmospheric sciences, forensic engineering, municipal or urban engineering, water resources engineering, materials engineering, coastal engineering,[4] surveying, and construction engineering.[6] Civil engineering takes place on all levels: in the public sector from municipal through to national governments, and in the private sector from individual homeowners through to international companies. Civil engineers typically possess an academic degree with a major in civil engineering.

The length of study for such a degree is usually three to five years and the completed degree is usually designated as a Bachelor of Engineering, though some universities designate the degree as a Bachelor of Science. The degree generally includes units covering physics, mathematics, project management, design and specific topics in civil engineering. Initially such topics cover most, if not all, of the sub-disciplines of civil engineering. Students then choose to specialize in one or more sub-disciplines towards the end of the degree.[15] While an Undergraduate (BEng/BSc) Degree will normally provide successful students with industry accredited qualification, some universities offer postgraduate engineering awards (MEng/MSc) which allow students to further specialize in their particular area of interest within engineering.[16] In most countries, a Bachelor’s degree in engineering represents the first step towards professional certification and the degree program itself is certified by a professional body. After completing a certified degree program the engineer must satisfy a range of requirements (including work experience and exam requirements) before being certified.

Once certified, the engineer is designated the title of Professional Engineer (in the United States, Canada and South Africa), Chartered Engineer (in most Commonwealth countries), Chartered Professional Engineer (in Australia and New Zealand), or European Engineer (in much of the European Union). There are international engineering agreements between relevant professional bodies which are designed to allow engineers to practice across international borders. The advantages of certification vary depending upon location. For example, in the United States and Canada “only a licensed professional engineer may prepare, sign and seal, and submit engineering plans and drawings to a public authority for approval, or seal engineering work for public and private clients.”.[17] This requirement is enforced by state and provincial legislation such as Quebec’s Engineers Act.[18]

In other countries such as the UK no such legislation exists. In Australia, state licensing of engineers is limited to the state of Queensland. Practically all certifying bodies maintain a code of ethics that they expect all members to abide by or risk expulsion.[19] In this way, these organizations play an important role in maintaining ethical standards for the profession. Even in jurisdictions where certification has little or no legal bearing on work, engineers are subject to contract law. In cases where an engineer’s work fails he or she may be subject to the tort of negligence and, in extreme cases, the charge of criminal negligence.[citation needed]An engineer’s work must also comply with numerous other rules and regulations such as building codes and legislation pertaining to environmental law. Careers

There is no one typical career path for civil engineers. Most people who graduate with civil engineering degrees start with jobs that require a low level of responsibility, and as the new engineers prove their competence, they are trusted with tasks that have larger consequences and require a higher level of responsibility. However, within each branch of civil engineering career path options vary. In some fields and firms, entry-level engineers are put to work primarily monitoring construction in the field, serving as the “eyes and ears” of senior design engineers; while in other areas, entry-level engineers perform the more routine tasks of analysis or design and interpretation. Experienced engineers generally do more complex analysis or design work, or management of more complex design projects, or management of other engineers, or into specialized consulting, including forensic engineering.

A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering; the application of planning, designing, constructing, maintaining, and operating infrastructures while protecting the public and environmental health, as well as improving existing infrastructures that have been neglected. Originally, a civil engineer worked on public works projects and was contrasted with the military engineer, who worked on armaments and defenses. Over time, various branches of engineering have become recognized as distinct from civil engineering, including chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering, while much of military engineering has been absorbed by civil engineering. In some places, a civil engineer may perform land surveying; in others, surveying is limited to construction surveying, unless an additional qualification is obtained. On some U.S. military bases, the personnel responsible for building and grounds maintenance, such as grass mowing, are called civil engineers and are not required to meet any minimum educational requirements.

Specialization
Civil engineers usually practice in a particular specialty, such as construction engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, land development, transportation engineering,hydraulic engineering, and environmental engineering. Some civil engineers, particularly those working for government agencies, may practice across multiple specializations, particularly when involved in critical infrastructure development or maintenance.

Education and licensing
In most countries, a civil engineer will have graduated from a post-secondary school with a degree in civil engineering, which requires a strong background in mathematics and the physical sciences; this degree is typically a bachelor’s degree, though many civil engineers study further to obtain masters, engineer, doctoral and post doctoral degrees. In many countries, civil engineers are subject to licensure. In jurisdictions with mandatory licensing, people who do not obtain a license may not call themselves “civil engineers.”

About civil engineering
Civil engineering is a professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction and maintenance of the physical and naturally built environment. Put simply, civil engineers build bridges, roads, canals, dams, tall buildings, and other large structures. Civil engineering is all about creating, improving and protecting the environment in which we live. It provides the facilities for day-to-day life and for transport and industry to go about its work. Like the Romans, Egyptians and Mayans who built great civilisations before us, our civilisation relies more than ever on teams of inventive people to design, build and maintain the sophisticated environment that surrounds us. Civil engineering was originally defined simply to distinguish non-military engineering from military engineering but it actually represents so much more. Without civil engineers we wouldn’t have a constant supply of clean water, roads or trains to get to work in the morning, or sustainable energy to help us save our planet. The Little Book of Civilisation looks at the amazing ways civil engineers overcome the challenges of creating and maintaining our infrastructure for us, and for future generations. Many of these challenges are met in a way that is sustainable, and all are met with style and innovation.

Much of the physical infrastructure of our modern society is provided by Civil Engineers. Civil Engineers are concerned with all types of structures including dams, bridges, pipelines, roads, towers and buildings. They are responsible for the design and construction of all our transport systems, the design and management of our gas and water supply, sewerage systems, harbours, airports and railways. Civil Engineers plan, design and test the structures of private and public buildings and facilities. They are also involved in many environmental areas such as the assessment of the impact large scale projects have on the environment and the collection and treatment of sewage and industrial wastes, pollution control, environmental control and resource protection and management.

A Civil Engineer will work from an architect’s drawings and consider whether the chosen materials for a particular building will be strong enough to hold a structure of that height or design. At the same time they would also think about how the structure might affect its surroundings. It is the responsibility of the civil engineer to produce safe, economical and environmentally-sound structures. Civil engineers may specialise as chief civil engineers, construction engineers, municipal engineers, structural engineers, transport engineers, or water supply distribution engineers. Civil and public health engineers may work in the private sector as consulting engineers, project managers or construction contractors or in a wide range of government departments. Work opportunities for civil engineers are affected by fluctuations in the building and construction industry. As a result, the number of opportunities may rise or fall over a short period of time.

Abilities of civil engineer –

A civil engineer should have sharp features such that he should be practical, sharp, practical and attentive. He always be eager for solving problems with effective results and can work under pressure and all conditions. He should have good communication skills also.

Do you know civil engineering is mother of all branches –

Engineering has been an aspect of life since the beginnings of human existence. Civil engineering might be considered properly commencing between 4000 and 2000 BC in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia when humans started to abandon a nomadic existence, thus causing a need for Engineering has been an aspect of life since the beginnings of human existence. Civil engineering might be considered properly commencing between 4000 and 2000 BC inAncient Egypt and Mesopotamia when humans started to abandon a nomadic existence, thus causing a need for the construction of shelter.

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