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Determining Causes and Effects-Revised Version Essay Sample

Determining Causes and Effects-Revised Version Pages
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Assignment 3.1: Determining Causes and Effects-Draft Version Attending College for many students is an exciting time in life. Students are on the edge of adult-hood and ready to start their new careers after graduation while others are well into adult hood and continuing their education. College life is a newfound freedom of being away from family and being able to make decisions on their own without having to ask for permission. Students often don’t think about the responsibilities, obligations and pressures that come with their transition to College life. College can be a significant cause of stress for students. Stress can come from many different sources in College, and some stress can be good for students if managed properly. However, college life does have some major stressors because of a lot of different reasons. Financial stress and academic stress are two major reasons of stress for college students and can lead to students dropping out of school, having sleep difficulties, lower grades on exams and major health issues if not controlled. Your opening provides a snapshot for your audience for your main ideas. Financial Stress

Financial stress is one of the leading stressors among undergraduates (American College Health Association, 2014). Financial stress can come from many different sources, but the cost of attending college is the most obvious. Most undergraduates depend on loans to finance their college educations. The typical Bachelors’ graduate with a loan averaged $27,300 in student loan debt (Baum, Elliott, & Ma, 2014). Financial stress can lead to students taking on more jobs, working more hours, and spending less money locally and can also have adverse effects on a student’s health. Good details here. Another source of financial stress in college students is worrying about finding a job after graduation. Students may worry about their ability to repay their loans especially in today’s economy with high unemployment for young adults. While students are not required to repay their loans while in college, they know at some point after graduation, it will be time to repay their student loan debt. “Over 60 percent of college seniors are worried they won’t land a job after graduation” (Andrecovich, 2009).

As many as 27 percent of students cite financial pressures being a daily stressor, and 17 percent have considered dropping out of school in the last three months (Andrecovich, 2009). Good facts. As a result of students dropping out of college over financial pressures, the economy lost $4.5 million dollars in lost earnings and tax revenue in 2010 alone (Jilani, 2011). Lost income to college dropouts was $3.8 billion and lost state income taxes accounted for $164 million dollars. $566 million lost in federal income taxes. These estimates only account for one year and one class of students. Since these losses accumulate each year, the estimates underestimate the overall costs of low graduation rates (Jilani, 2011). . According to the National Survey of Student Engagement, financial stress keeps as many as one in three students from purchasing all the required academic materials due to cost (Indiana University, 2012). Academic Stress

Academic stress among college students is a leading second cause of stress among college students (Ross, Niebling, & Heckert, 1999). Academic stress is an everyday stressor among students. A bigger workload and worry over grades for college students account for 77 percent of student academic stress. Excessive homework, unclear assignments, and uncomfortable classrooms are a new challenge for students to get use to in college life and can be a trigger for academic stress. An excessive workload can lead to physical health problems and a lack of balance in a student’s life; resulting in migraines, ulcers, sleep deprivation and exhaustion (Galloway, Conner, & Pope, 2013). Good facts. A student that gets a lower grade than expected on an exam can also trigger academic stress (Ross, Niebling, & Heckert, 1999). Six out of ten students are so academically stressed, they can’t get their homework done on at least one occasion.

Academic stress can affect a student socially with 53 percent reporting feeling so stress they did not want to hang out with their friends on one or more days (Andrecovich, 2009). Sleep difficulties can be yet another trigger of academic stress. According to a study that was done by the University of Minnesota’s Boynton Health Service that surveyed almost 10,000 students, 27 percent reported having sleep difficulties that impacted their academics. Students that participated in the study had an average GPA of 3.08 compared with 3.27 for those who got enough sleep. “The more days a student gets adequate sleep, the better GPA’s they attain,” Dr. Ehlinger said (Ellis, 2015). At least two paragraphs are needed for the effects of the people. You combine two ideas here-emotional and mental. Adding an additional paragraph is needed here. All that stress can lead to emotional and mental health problems. Indeed, the second leading cause of death among college students is suicide, which accounts for about 1,100 deaths per year on campuses (Meglio, 2012).

Oh goodness. Nice fact here. According to a study by the American College Counseling Association, 37.4 percent of college students seeking help have severe psychological problems with depression and anxiety being the most prevalent mental health issues students have to face. In the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), researchers study the ways in which the immune system and the nervous system communicate with each other and impact a student’s mental and emotional health (Mills, Reiss, & Dombech, 2015). Research suggests that chronic stress can lead to mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, bipolar disorder, cognitive problems, personality changes and behavioral problems. Some students experience personality changes in response to stress such as irritability, hostility, anger, decreased interest in appearance and social withdrawal and isolation. College students suffering from stressors can have major emotional and mental health concerns if not managed.

In conclusion, it seems that if managed properly, stress can be controlled. Given the detrimental effects of stress on health and academic performance, college administrators should consider incorporating stress management training in orientation activities. At a bare minimum, the primary sources of stress should be identified to new students. Furthermore, students should be informed of the campus resources available to help all students deal with stress, both financial and academic and any emotional or health issues that might arise during the journey through college. Your conclusion summarizes your ideas well.

References

American College Health Association. (2014). Amercian College Health
Association-National College Health Assessment II. Hanover, MD: Reference Group Executive Summary Spring 2014. Andrecovich, E. (2009, July 29). Promoting emotional health and preventing suicide. Retrieved from www.jedfoundation.org: http://www.jedfoundation.org/press-room/press-releases/New-mtvU-Associated-Press-Poll-Shows-How-Stress-Economy-Other-Factors-Are-Affecting-College-Students-Mental-Health Baum, S., Elliott, D., & Ma, J. (2014). Trends in Student Aid. Trends in Higher Education Series. New York: College Board. Ellis, M. (2015, January 16). How Stress Affects Academic Performance. Retrieved from healthNews: 2015 Galloway, M., Conner, J., & Pope, D. (2013). Nonacademic Effects of Homework in Privileged,High-Performing High Schools. The Journal of Experimental Education, 490-510. Indiana University. (2012, November 15). IU News Room. Retrieved from http://www.indiana.edu: http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/23479.html Jilani, Z. (2011, August 23). education. Retrieved from thinkprogress.org: http://thinkprogress.org/education/2011/08/23/301932/college-dropout-lost-earnings-taxes/ Meglio, F. D. (2012, May 10). Stress Takes its Toll on College Students. Retrieved from BloombergBusiness: http://www.bloomberg.com Mills, H., Reiss, N., & Dombech, M. (2015). Mental and Emotional Impact of Stress. Retrieved from sevencounties: http://www.sevencounties.org/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=15649&cn=117 Ross, S. E., Niebling, B. C., & Heckert, T. M. (1999). Sources of stress among college students. College Student Journal;, 312.

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