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Diversity in the Workplace Essay Sample

Diversity in the Workplace Pages
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Introduction:
There are various kinds of people work in same workplace. Even though there are individual differences exist among people, still they should be treated fairly in the workplace. At present workplace discrimination is considered as a major issue in many places. In this diversity in the workplace paper we will focus on discrimination in the workplace, federal and state legislations regarding workplace discriminations, the responsibilities of human service manager to handle the issues, and the effects of such discrimination on development and management of human resources. Discrimination at the workplace

I personally have not been discriminated against at my workplace. However I do have an example of discrimination that happened to a co-worker at my job. We had a new co-worker come in, she was in her twenties and had the type of personality that would say what was on her mind and didn’t care what others thought. Other employees had the impression that she thought she was better than everyone. We have a diverse group of employees at my work that includes, white, black, and Spanish speaking. After many complaints about our new co-worker the management/owners had a meeting with her. They told her that she needed to start making friends with the other teachers and to stay away from the Spanish speaking crowd because they only gossiped and she would never fit in with them. So they basically told her to become acquainted with the lead white teachers. To me the owners were discriminating against the Spanish speakers at my work and doing this behind their back. Federal and state legislation

•Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; •the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA), which protects men and women who perform substantially equal work in the same establishment from sex-based wage discrimination; •the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), which protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older; •Title I and Title V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended (ADA), which prohibit employment discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in the private sector, and in state and local governments; •Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities who work in the federal government;

•Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), which prohibits employment discrimination based on genetic information about an applicant, employee, or former employee; and •the Civil Rights Act of 1991, which, among other things, provides monetary damages in cases of intentional employment discrimination.The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces all of these laws. EEOC also provides oversight and coordination of all federal equal employment opportunity regulations, practices, and policies. Other federal laws, not enforced by EEOC, also prohibit discrimination and reprisal against federal employees and applicants. The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA) contains a number of prohibitions, known as prohibited personnel practices, which are designed to promote overall fairness in federal personnel actions. 5 U.S.C. 2302.

The CSRA prohibits any employee who has authority to take certain personnel actions from discriminating for or against employees or applicants for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or disability. It also provides that certain personnel actions cannot be based on attributes or conduct that do not adversely affect employee performance, such as marital status and political affiliation. The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has interpreted the prohibition of discrimination based on conduct to include discrimination based on sexual orientation. The CSRA also prohibits reprisal against federal employees or applicants for whistle-blowing, or for exercising an appeal, complaint, or grievance right. The CSRA is enforced by both the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) and the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) (Federal laws…, 2009). Responsibilities of human service managers

Management of Humans services has the responsibility of enforcing laws and regulations against discrimination. They have the responsibility to train employees to understand cultural differences and to treat everyone with equal respect. Within my dream organization, Children Of The World, we will not discriminate against race, culture, sex. We encourage exploration of different cultures and their values and beliefs. That is why we have a diverse group of staff who provide support to children and families that come from different cultures and backgrounds. Development and management of human resources

Diversity and discrimination greatly affect development and management of human resources. When developing an agency their needs to be a diverse set of staff engaged. Management should know all the laws and regulations regarding to discrimination. Diversity brings more clients into agencies because clients feel more comfortable when there are other individuals who can speak their language and understand their culture. There are also more services available to diverse groups. Conclusion:

We can conclude that discrimination at workplace is existed and it is one of the major issues which stand as an obstacle on the way of human resource development. It is important to avoid partiality and discrimination at workplaces in order to generate productive and efficient professionals. Also human resource managers need to implement the federal and state legislations strictly so that discrimination at workplace and avoided or reduced significantly.

Reference:
Federal Laws prohibiting job discrimination.(2009). Retrieved September 9, 2013 from http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/qanda.html

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