Edit this essay
only $12.90/page

Dog Tags and Following Orders Essay Sample

Dog Tags and Following Orders Pages
Pages: Word count: Rewriting Possibility: % ()

Dog tags are required components of the military uniform. Dog tags are used to show a service member’s name, social security number, blood type, and religious preference in case the service member becomes a casualty. Army Regulation 670-1 states that every service member must wear I.D tags at all times when traveling or overseas, even in civilian clothing, and that every service member in uniform must wear them in their everyday duty uniform. The importance and purpose of dog tags can be dated back to 1870 in the Franco-Prussian war. The Prussians issued them to their soldiers for the sake of identification; they got the nickname dog tag or Hundermark (German for dog tag) because dogs were issued matching tags in Prussian cities. (1) The tags we use today originated in World War 1, and the purpose was that soldiers feared dying and being forgotten, so they created aluminum tags two of them, one to be taken when the soldier dies and the other to be left with the body, for easy identification. (2) The importance of dog tags and origin, though, are two entirely different things. We have dog tags with just enough of our personal information necessary to identify an unidentifiable body.

Even after one hundred forty three years, our military uses dog tags for the same reason, identification. In many cases if it wasn’t for a dog tag tied in the back pocket, in a boot, or around the neck, a body would have went unidentified. It’s also important when an emergency transfusion is needed or a religious figure is needed to give the soldiers last rights or to give him a service. It also has an importance many might not know it’s a symbol of the oath that all of the soldiers have taken, an oath to defend the constitution from enemies foreign and domestic. When a soldier dies, he or she buried with his or her dog tag around his or her neck so that even many years later that body will be identifiable. Service members conducting routine daily activities even in garrison may be at risk of becoming a casualty. Such as; heat or cold weather casualty or if a service member loses consciousness or is unable to communicate, dog tags are read to gain very important information as listed above. Also the length of the dog tag’s chain often varies, and usually the number of beads on a chain is around two hundred and fifty.

However, prisoners of war can remove one bead per day to accurately track the number of days the service member is in captivity. If a dog tag is found there is even a certain procedure that must be followed in order to return the tag correctly to the proper soldier. When someone joins the military, he or she is aware that there may be a chance of going to war, and that the most meaningful sacrifice he or she could ever make and is willing to make, may become a reality. Just like in the old days, upon enlisting, the service member is issued a set of dog tags. Dog tags are the most important item ever issued and should not be handled carelessly. Sometimes though, the importance of these tags is dismissed by a significant other or a family member asking for one of them. Although, more can be made, and if your significant other feels the time is right, he or she will give you one. If the time is right, and you receive this most important tag, handle it with the most care you’ve given anything. You need to hold it in highest position and make sure nothing ever happens to it.

It is more than an honor to receive a tag from someone you care about and or love. Also, it may be appropriate if a loved one passes away and you burry your dog tag’s within their grave, just make sure you absolutely get your dog tags replaces as soon as possible. Dog tags are not just for some kind of accountability, dog tags are way more than that. The Importance of Following Commands from Your Senior Non-Commissioned Officers Accountability is simply being responsible for one’s actions. Accountability is the quality or state of being accountable, which by definition means an obligation or willingness to accept responsibility. Every soldier is responsible to perform all assigned duties in a proficient manner, and those who neglect this responsibility will be held accountable. It is crucial to the success of the military to instill accountability into each and every one of their service members. Accountability is so strictly enforced because the failure of one soldier to do its part could result in the failure of team’s entire mission.

Accountability is a very important part of a soldier’s job, whether that soldier is junior enlisted or an NCO. The enlisted soldier is responsible for all items issued to them whether it be the individual’s weapon, dog tags, NVG’s, clothes, a vehicle, or any another item. Accountability is really important to NCO’s, as they are responsible for the most essential items of all…and that’s the soldiers who serve beneath them. Key leaders use this method to determine the whereabouts and well-being of all the soldiers, and their property. Accountability can also be described as being dependable. By being dependable, soldiers arrive to work and appointments on time, meet deadlines, arrive at the right place at the right time, and always do the right thing at the right time.

An NCO must lead by example and train his soldiers to a high level of proficiency and readiness in their team skills. An NCO’s job is to get things done without having to be told first by a commissioned officer. The NCO must think ahead at all times and not just sit and wait for things to happen. The team leader must know the squad leader’s job and the squad leader must know the platoon sergeant’s job and soon up the NCO channel. They must also know the jobs of those soldiers under him. (3) A good NCO must know his job and know it well. An NCO goes through many, many, many years of very hard work to be the rank and in the leadership position they are in now. When a senior NCO gives you a command order, it’s in your best interest that you follow it. NCO’s don’t just make up stuff off the top of their head for you do for no specific reason. The reason is probably coming from another higher up. The Noncommissioned Officer is the backbone of the military; they are the ones who take care of, lead and train their soldiers on and off the field of battle. They set the example for others to follow, and are held to higher standards because of it.

The Non Commissioned Officer is held to such a high standard they have their own creed which it clearly states “No one is more professional than I.” “Creed of the Noncommissioned Officer, first sentence first line” The Non Commissioned Officer was first inducted into the military with the creation of the Continental Army in 1775, but at that time they had no true responsibilities until Inspector General Fredrich von Stueben gave the Non Commissioned Officer their standards known as the “blue book”. In the blue book it emphasizes the importance of selecting good quality men to be an Noncommissioned Officer. Still today that blue book and tradition is kept alive.(4) The Noncommissioned Officer not only trains his soldiers but also looks after the welfare of his soldiers. He influences, gives them direction, motivates and improves their training. Many of the army’s leaders are familiar with the phrase Be Know Do. Be referring to one’s inner strength, Know is saying leaders must have a certain level of knowledge to be competent in their job, Do refers to the leaders actions Influencing, operating and improving.

The Noncommissioned Officer is in the role of direct leadership, face to face, first line leadership. The Noncommissioned Officer support channel really help Officers do their jobs, it takes a lot of stress off of their shoulders. “Army Leadership FM 22-100” People often don’t realize how important orders are; orders can be as simple as cleaning up your area of operation or as complicated as taking out a bunker using battle drill five. No matter who was to give you the order or command, the vitality of following that order is tremendous. For example, and Noncommissioned Officer tells you to take four men and flank right, which is on the right side of a house that four enemy are located, the purpose of this is for you to draw their fire so the remainder of the squad can push forward to assault the house, but you don’t do it and the rest of the squad run into accurate gunfire killing your squad and leaving you alive. The effects that would have on you is surmountable. So the importance of following an order is great. Of course if the order is unlawful, if a Noncommissioned Officer or Officer gives you a direct kill order to kill an innocent civilian it is in your right to deny that order, for it is immoral and unjust.

Any plan is better than no plan. Even if you don’t like the orders you were given. However, these are the things that haven tried and proven to work. This is what separates the winners from the losers. Therefore, the worst orders, if followed to a T has a better chance of success than a good order not carried out fully. Military discipline and effectiveness is built on the foundation of obedience to orders. Recruits are taught to obey, immediately and without question, orders from their superiors, right from day-one of boot camp. This is why we work so well by following orders from the more experienced leaders who have been doing this for years.

Search For The related topics

  • officer