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How Is Your Selected Industry Regulated? Essay Sample

How Is Your Selected Industry Regulated? Pages
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All television programmes must stay within certain regulations set by Ofcom or for the BBC the BBC trust. Some programmes stay within these regulations but others do not. Before the watershed programmes must be suitable for their target audience, especially if there is a chance children could be watching. TV channels need to keep this is mind. The watershed stop at 9:00pm and this is when programmes which wouldn’t normally be shown to children are put on, this is to protect under 18’s from anything that could influence them in a dangerous way or cause distress. ‘The Inbetweeners’ protects the under 18’s by showing episodes after 9:00pm and if an episode which contains strong language is shown before 9:00pm then it will have the swearing left out of it, to try to make it suitable, this also excludes sexual scenes, crime and nudity. ‘The Inbetweeners’ could be seen as almost social deviants, because of the sort of situations they get in to and how they act around other people, this comes under category 2 which is harm and offence, Seriously antisocial behaviour is not to be promoted and the main characters in this programme seem to cause trouble a lot within the series.

Moving on to the ‘BBC News’, despite having an independence from Ofcom the BBC have almost identical rules that must be followed. ‘The BBC News’ is probably one of the hardest programmes to keep within the rules, as its job is to get us the non-bias news, reporting on crime, offense, worldwide affairs, elections and lots more. ‘The BBC News’ has to be very careful with fairness, as stereotypes on the news can become an hegemonic belief if the viewers believe what’s being said, and through representation and editing feeling about different groups, genders, race and age are easy to create. An example of ‘The BBC News’ going against The BBC Trust’s fairness regulation was with Joanna Yates murder, an innocent man was a suspect because he acted a bit different to how people should act socially and the press and all media represented him as the murderer, this was unfair and will follow him his whole life, this is how powerful the media are and why these regulations must be put in place.

‘The BBC News’ has two showings, one at 6:00pm and the other at 10:00pm, one before and one after the watershed to protect the under 18’s against violent stories, however this isn’t always the case. When 9/11 was shown on the news it showed live footage on the 6:00pm showing when under 18’s could have been watching these violent images, furthermore they did the same with the London Riots and showed violent images which could cause distress to younger viewers, the London Riot’s were also represented as if teenagers were to blame for this, and teenagers received a bad representation when The News is meant to be non-bias.

Moving on to the ‘X Factor’, one of the most popular family shows on the television, although it’s viewers have decreased its popularity among the population does remain. It is shown on ITV and ITV answers to Ofcom’s rules and regulation. Being a family show ‘X Factor’ knows that children will be watching at this time and have to keep performances and language clean to protect them. Fairness, however, could be seen as an issue towards the contestants, as the ‘X Factor’ uses editing, like the news, in order to create a representation of different people auditioning and not really to our knowledge, not all of the acts that apply get to see the judges, in actuality the production team chooses the acts to send through to the judges, based on how good they are, their entertainment value such as acts that will cause drama or are somewhat disillusional, this could be classed as unfair as the people who see the judges who are considered the jokes of the show, probably don’t know they’re being humiliated in front of millions of people.

During the recent live shows of the ‘X Factor’ guest singers Christina Aguilera and Rihanna both gave inappropriate performances for a family show, before the watershed, during Rihanna’s song ‘What’s My Name’ she removed her coat and was singing in her underwear which isn’t appropriate for the audience watching. Christina Aguilera song ‘express’ which her and the background dancers preformed was meant to mimic a strip tease performance or a ‘Burlesque’. Both of these performances received complaints to Ofcom most likely from parents complaining about sexual material and nudity. Young girls see these singers as roles models and want to be like them and this is not something that should be promoted children.

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