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Kabaddi South Asian team sport Essay Sample

Kabaddi South Asian team sport Pages
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Kabaddi (sometimes transliterated Kabbadi or Kabadi; (Bengali: কাবাডি, Hindi: कबड्डी, Kannada: ಕಬಡಿ, Malayalam: കബഡി, Marathi: कबड्डी, Punjabi: ਕਬੱਡੀ, Persian: کودّی، کبدی, Tamil: சடுகுடு, கபடி, Telugu: కబడ్దీ, Urdu: کبڈی) is a South Asian team sport. The name is derived from the Tamil word (கை-பிடி) “kai” (hand), “pidi” (catch), which is translated into “Holding Hands”.[1] Two teams occupy opposite halves of a small swimming pool / field and take turns sending a “raider” into the other half, in order to win points by tackling members of the opposing team; then the raider tries to return to his own half, holding his breath and chanting the word “Kabaddi” during the whole raid. The raider must not cross the lobby unless he touches any of his opponents. If he does so then he will be declared as “out”.

There is also a bonus line which ensure extra points for the raider if he manages to touch it and return to his side of the field successfully. In the international team version of kabaddi, two teams of seven members each occupy opposite halves of a field of 10 m × 13 m in case of men and 8 m × 12 m in case of women.[2] Each has three supplementary players held in reserve. The game is played with 20-minute halves and a five-minute halftime break during which the teams exchange sides. Teams take turns sending a “raider” to the opposite team’s half, where the goal is to tag or wrestle (“confine”) members of the opposite team before returning to the home half. Tagged members are “out” and temporarily sent off the field. The goal of the defenders is to stop the raider from returning to the home side before taking a breath. If any of the seven players cross the lobby without touching the raider he will be declared as “out”. The raider is sent off the field if:

* the raider takes a breath before returning or
* the raider crosses a boundary line or
* a part of the raider’s body touches the ground outside the boundary (except during a struggle with an opposing team member). Each time when a player is “out”, the opposing team earns a point. A team scores a bonus of two points, called a “lona”, if the entire opposing team is declared “out”. At the end of the game, the team with the most points wins. Matches are categorized based on age and weight. Six officials supervise a match: one referee, two umpires, a scorer and two assistant scorers.
Types of Kabaddi
Amar
In the ‘Amar’ form of Kabaddi, whenever any player is touched (out), he does not go out of the court, but stays inside, and one point is awarded to the team that touched him. This game is also played on a time basis, i.e. the time is fixed. This form of kabaddi is played in India (Punjab), Canada, England, New Zealand, USA, Pakistan and Australia. In the Amar form of Kabaddi, each team consists of 5–6 stoppers and 4–5 raiders. At one time, only 4 stoppers are allowed to play on the field. Every time a stopper stops the raider from going back to his starting point, that stoppers team gets 1 point. On the other hand, every time the raider tags one of the stoppers and returns to his starting point, his team gets one point. [edit]Sanjeevni

In Sanjeevni Kabaddi, one player is revived against one player of the opposite team who is out, one out, one in. The duration, the number of players, dimensions of the court, etc. have been fixed by the Kabaddi Federation of India. This form of Kabaddi is the closest to the present game. In this form of Kabaddi, players are put out and revived and the game lasts 40 minutes with a 5-minute break in between. There are nine players on each side. The team that puts out all the players on the opponent’s side scores four extra points for a ‘Lona’. The winning team is the one that scores most points after 40 minutes. The field is bigger in this form of Kabaddi and the ‘chant’ different in various regions. Modern Kabaddi resembles this form of Kabaddi especially with regard to ‘out & in system’ and ‘Lona’. [edit]Gaminee

This is played with nine players on either side, in a field of no specific measurements. The characteristic is that a player put out has to remain out until all his team members are out. The team that is successful in putting out all the players of the opponent’s side secures a point. This is akin to the present system of ‘Lona’. After all the players are put out, the team is revived and the game continues. The game continues until five or seven ‘Lona’ are secured. This form of Kabaddi has no fixed game time. The main disadvantage of Gamines is that the player is not in position to give his best performance since he is likely to remain out for the better part of the match until a Lona is scored. India

The Kabaddi Federation of India (KFI) was founded in 1950, and it compiled a standard set of rules. The Amateur Kabaddi Federation of India (AKFI) was founded in 1973.The AKFI has given new shape to the rules and it has also the rights of modification in the rules. The Asian Kabaddi Federation was founded under the chairmanship of Sharad Pawar. The Governing body of Kabaddi in Asia is Asian Kabaddi Federation (AKF) headed by Mr. Janardan Singh Gehlot. AKF is affiliated to Olympic Council of Asia. Parent body to regulate the game at international level is International Kabaddi Federation (IKF). Their website is http://www.kabaddiikf.com In 1979, a return test between Bangladesh and India was held at different places of India including Mumbai, Hyderabad, and Punjab. The Asian Kabaddi Championship was successfully arranged in 1980 and India emerged as the champion and Bangladesh as the runners-up. Bangladesh became runners-up again in 1985 in Asian Kabaddi Championship held in Jaipur, India.

The other teams included in the tournament were Nepal, Malaysia and Japan. Kabaddi was played as a demonstration sport at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin. The game was included for the first time in Asian Games held in Beijing in 1990. Eight countries took part including India, China, Japan, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Bangladesh. India won the gold medal and has since won gold at the following three Asian Games in Hiroshima in 1994, Bangkok in 1998,Busan in 2002,and in Doha 2006. Kabaddi is popular throughout South Asia, and has also spread to Southeast Asia, Japan and Iran. It is the national game of Bangladesh where it is known as Haḍuḍu. It is the state game of Punjab,Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, and Maharashtra in India. It is played by the British Army for fun, to keep fit and as an enticement to recruit soldiers from the British Asian community. The game is also played extensively in the small town of Peebles in the Scottish Borders, mainly in the local primary school playground, where it is favored to more traditional childhood past-times such as ‘British bulldogs’ and ‘Kiss, Cuddle and Torture’

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