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Obesity Epidemic Solution Essay Sample

Obesity Epidemic Solution Pages
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A student that brings fast food as a school lunch might not even differ if we compare it with the school menu’s ingredients. According to a paragraph from the National Lunch Program article states that, “food distributed by National Lunch Program contains some of the ingredients found in fast food, and the resulting meals routinely fails to meet basic nutritional standards” (Water, Heron para. 4). The food in serve in school cafeterias are not as healthy as we think they are. With this in mind, I’ve developed an idea or a solution in reducing the chance child obesity which is ​

changing the school’s menu into adding healthier ingredients and decreasing fat, sugars and sodium that will able meet the daily basic nutritional standards. The purpose in stating my claim is in hope to persuade Americans to change their eating habits, or at least to inform them that consumption of unhealthful food can lead to many diseases; starting with the obesity epidemic. In fact, the main problem is that the obesity epidemic can lead to many various diseases; specifically, for example, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, heart disease, etc. Although, we are probably thinking fast food meals are the sources of producing obesity that can affect us, however, school menus can also affect a student’s health. Think about it, what cause the problem in the first place? According to Brody, he claims that, when women entered the workforce, the food industry grew and produced stocks of food containing rich in sugar, salt and fat that people are expected to desire. (Brody para. 11). He explained that what contained on the food products targets people who will want them constantly. In addition, without realizing that people can’t maintain their health will cause them to great consequences. The production of unhealthful food made widely available created the development of obesity.

In agreement with the National Institute of Health stating that, “obesity is the next major epidemiologic challenge facing today’s doctors, with the annual allocation of healthcare resources for the disease and related commodities projected to exceed $150 billion the United States” (Hurt). Obesity became a widespread challenge that it reached billions of dollars for healthcare distribution. Furthermore, the article included data results that obesity rate had risen for the past 30 years. A study by the National Institute of Health claims that, “60% of adults are currently either obese or overweight” (Hurt). That’s more than half of our population that are obese over 3 decades. These [provide proofs and explain that we need to take action immediately into solving the problem.

A solution that Mark Bittman constructed says, “simply put: taxes would reduce consumption foods and generate billion of dollars annually” (Bittman para.7). Although, I agree that taxing junk foods can lower the consumption of unhealthy food, however it doesn’t directly reduce obesity. The reason is because no matter what, people who are wealthy enough can always purchase unhealthful foods. In addition, people who don’t agree might complain that their accesses of food are being breached.

A study from the U.S. Department of Agriculture states that, “Ninety percent of schools reports are successfully meeting the updated nutrition standards. The new meals are providing kids more whole grain, fruits, vegetables, lean protein and low fat dairy as well as less sugar fat and sodium” (Fact Sheet). This fact proves that if schools change their menu into healthier ingredients then they would reach the nutritional standards. This will impact in reducing the students’ chance of childhood obesity. Additionally, the statistics given by Nancy Walsh says “Further analysis comparing obesity rates are according to state nutrition requirements confirmed a decrease of 12.3%” (Walsh para. 12). The rate if decrease in obesity is not much but at least it’s a starting step towards change of the problem in obesity. These are evidence to support my claim that changing school meals that meets the nutritional standards can cut down childhood obesity rates.

A contrast statement for my claim would be that it’s not possible to change the school ingredients that will able to resolve childhood obesity, because of the consumption of high fructose corn syrup. Given evidence from the article written by Paul-Emil Johnson tells that, “Invented in a lab, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) was slowly added to just about everything in our food system” (Johnson para. 16). I agree with the fact that every food products from today contains high level of corn syrup because it is cheaper than sugar. But on the other hand; Sun Sz contradicts that, “Obesity rates have also risen dramatically across Europe in the absence of a parallel rise in Glucose fructose corn syrup intakes” (Johnson para. 16). This proves that the comparison between obesity and the consumption of HFCs has no link, which means it’s possible to change ingredients of school menus.

As a final point, Obesity is not only as a student’s matter but also it’s been issued globally which we need to achieve into preventing the rise of youth obesity. By changing the production of school meals that reaches daily nutritious needed and as well as to maintain a balance diet. As a result, not only we can impact the society and save kids from diseases, but also we can provide proof that it’s possible to keep kids from obesity. Students who concern about their health and are afraid of the possibilities of being in an obese state should agree with the idea of changing school menus as well. Student’s parents should also get involve in helping their kids food choices because as expected they care about the kids well state being. That way it might initiate the school administrator and principal to commit responsibility to solving the problem. Moreover, the state’s government will likely engage to alternate the school menus to healthful foods, due to school demands for the National School Lunch Program to take action in serving healthier ingredients in their menus.

Works Cited

Hurt, Ryan., Christopher Kulisek, Laura A. Buchanan, and Stephen A. Mc Clave. “Abstract.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library Of Medicine, 31 May 2006. Web. 29 September 2014.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC30333553/​
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Walsh, Nancy. Healthy School Lunches Cut Kids’ Obesity Rates. Ed. Robert Jasmer. Parelman School of Medicine, 8 Apr. 2013. Web. 29 September 2014.
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Obesity/38327​
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Johnson, Paul-Emil. What is Glucose Fructose Syrup. Ed. Philip Sqpriguel. Health of the Net Foundation, Feb. 2012. Web. 29 September 2014.
http://www.eufic.org/page/en/page/FAQ/faqid/glucose-fructose-syrup/

Fact Sheet: Healthy, Hunger-Free kids Act School Meals Implementation. U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3, feb. 2013. Web. 29 September 2014.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/pressrelease/2014/009814​
.

Waters, Alice, and Katrina Heron. No Lunch Left Behind. New York Times, 19 Feb. 2009. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/20/opinion/20waters.html?_r=0​ .
Brody, Jane E. Attacking the Obesity Epidemic by first Figuring Out Its Cause. New York Times, 12 Sept. 2011. Web. 29 September 2014.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/13/health/13brody.html?pagewanted=all Bittman, MArk. Bad Food? Tax it, and Subsidize Vegetables. New York times, 23 July 2011. Web. 29 September 2014.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/24/opinion/sunday/24bittman.html?pagewanted=al l&module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar

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