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Outing to The Royal Oak Essay Sample

Outing to The Royal Oak Pages
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The minibus will arrive to collect everyone approx. 11.00am. The minibus company have been informed of the requirements needed, and have agreed to provide suitable transport, so there should be no problem. There will be 6 individuals, 3 full time staff & 2 helpers/volunteers attending. (11 people in total) Risk assessments have been previously carried out and updated. Before leaving, each individuals care plan must be read to see if they have any special needs to be adhered to such as medication at specific times and if the medication should be taken with food. The journey will take 1 hour, so you will be arriving at the venue approx. 12noon-12.15. The venue has been made aware of seating requirements needed and are complying fully with our requests. When everyone is seated and comfortable there will be a 3 course meal followed by entertainment which will finish at 4.30 when the minibus will return to collect everyone. You will be expected back approx. 6pm.

Ai –Accidents or sudden illness may occur, for example:-
Asthma attack – Worsening of asthma symptoms despite using quick relief inhaler. Severe shortness of breath, chest tightness or pain, and coughing or wheezing. Being too breathless to speak or eat. Feel nauseous or vomit – Nausea is an uneasiness of the stomach that often comes before vomiting. Vomiting is the forcible voluntary or involuntary emptying (“throwing up”) of stomach contents through the mouth. Fall – Someone may lose their footing or balance and fall

Sunburn – When you get sunburn, your skin turns red and hurts. If the burn is severe, you can develop swelling and sunburn blisters. You may even feel like you have the flu — feverish, with chills, nausea, headache, and weakness.

Aii – Procedures to follow if an accident or sudden illness should occur:-
Comfort the individual and call for help.
A person who is fully trained in emergency first aid should assess the situation and call for the appropriate help. I.e. ambulance if necessary If they have fallen or tripped over furniture (i.e. a stool) move the item and make sure the area is clear and free from obstruction. Stay with them and monitor and note any changes in their condition. (This will help ambulance staff etc.) Contact Manager, then the individual’s family/next of kin can be informed. Follow company policies/procedures and remember to record/document details. Fill out an accident/incident report as soon as possible.

Aiii – Principles for safe moving and handling
Avoid hazardous manual handling
Adhere to the requirements of any risk assessments in place Reporting any problems or difficulties to the Manager, including injuries and accidents Use equipment properly and safely as trained

Follow appropriate systems of work and use the equipment provided correctly Take reasonable care to ensure that your actions do not put individuals or others at risk
Aiv – Importance of communication with each individual when moving & assisting. Follow the guidelines as explained in care plans, which is important, so you will know what each individual needs and their risk assessment. You communicate to obtain the individual’s consent and ensure they understand why they are being moved and handled in particular ways and how they can usefully co-operate in the procedure. You communicate, so individuals do not get anxious or worried, and you can listen to their concerns. Active Support encourages individuals to do as much for themselves as possible to maintain their independence and physical ability and encourages people with disabilities to maximise their own potential and independence. Lifting someone incorrectly can damage fragile skin, cause shoulder and neck injuries, increase existing breathing difficulties, or cause bruising or cuts. If you follow the guidelines in their care plan this risk is minimised. Risks of injury to your self – The most common injuries carers experience are back injuries. Injuring your back will limit your movement and your ability to care for someone. It could take a long time for you to recover.

Av – Staff responsibilities for medication
Care staff should only assist with medication where they have the required training and they are competent to do so. Following a risk assessment and the consent of the service user, the level of assistance required will be within the Care Plan. It is the responsibility of the Care Staff to follow the care plan and adhere with company policies. Also to report any concerns to their manager. Avi – Agreed medication procedures for;

Obtaining :-
When a care service is responsible for requesting a supply of medicines, it is up to the manager to ensure that there is a system in place to get them in a reasonable period. Where care workers visit the person’s home they may need to clarify who will be responsible for requesting repeat prescriptions — the person or a relative. Storing:

Medicines must be stored in a cool, dry place unless otherwise stated on the label (for example some medicines must be stored in a fridge). All medicines must be kept out of the reach of children.

All medicines must be kept in a locked and secure way
They cannot be mixed up with other people’s medicines.
They cannot be stolen
They do not pose a risk to anyone else.

Administering:-
Only people who are adequately trained and competent should administer medication. People should receive the right medicine at the right time and in the right way. Preserve dignity and privacy

Recording:-
It is important to record what you do when you do it, in line with your company policies. Care at home: The individual’s care notes include the date and time that the care worker prompted the person to take his/her medicine. This information is vital to other care workers who also visit this person. Printed MAR chart in a care home

Everyone involved in looking after medicines for other people is responsible for keeping good records.

Avii – Explanation of why social care workers accompanying the individuals should have specialist training in the following:- Emergency First Aid –
If a person who is not trained in emergency first aid tries to treat an individual, further harm, injury or even death could occur. It also complies with health and safety standards and legislation, which will fall under the policies and procedures of any working environment Assisting with moving & handling:-

If you have not been trained in moving and handling an individual you risk causing discomfort, distress and serious injury to the individual or to yourself. Specialist training helps you to understand individual’s preferences and needs so you are more able to meet the standards required therefore keeping them more comfortable and with dignity. If you use equipment which you have not been trained for, like a hoist, you risk causing serious injury and you will be failing in your duty of care. Health and safety standards include that any person who will be moving and handling an individual must be trained in the correct procedures. Employees have a general obligation under the Health and Safety Act to take care of others and cooperate with employers’ health and safety requirements. Handling Medication:-

In social care settings, people who are unable to manage their own medicines are entitled to have someone who is adequately trained and knowledgeable to give medicines to them. Only staff that have been given appropriate training and have demonstrated they are competent should do this. If staff do not know how to give medicines safely they may accidentally cause someone harm. An error in giving medicines could result in the individual’s death. Safe administration of medicines means that medicines are given in a way that avoids causing harm to a person.

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