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Probation and Punishment Essay Sample

Probation and Punishment Pages
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In review of Kris’ file, I learned that Kris had been in trouble in the past, as a juvenile, Kris was arrested both for battery and trespassing and now as an adult Kris has been arrested for theft. Kris, now a married adult is looking to “start over and have a life outside of crime.

In review of Kris’ probation paperwork, I do agree with Robert’s decision for thoughts for the most part. I agree with Robert in the fact that Kris needs an intensive probation program in order to keep him in line and make sure that he is following the rules of the program. Also, I agree with Robert’s view point that since Kris is now a married man and wants a life on the straight and arrow, he likely will not commit another crim. However, I do not agree with Robert that most or all people who habitually commit crimes come from bad families and have experience physical and sexual abuse. I know that these factors can definitely increase the probability of habitually committing crime, but a lot of times, I would say people just do what they know. If they started in a life of crime at an early age, such as Kris, and are continuously in and out of the system, they will jut continue to do what they know.

A person that needs to be in an intensive probation program needs to have a high probability of committing another crime. These criminals need to be monitored, not only for their safety, but also for the community’s safety. Keeping a close eye on these criminals will greatly reduce their chances of committing another crim. Also, in order to be a good candidate for an intensive probation program, I think the criminal needs to show that they are ready to make change in their life. This is important, because if they are not ready to change their life they are not worth the effort, to put it frankly. Nothing will change a person except that person, so if they are not willing to put in the work for themselves, probation officers should not either. Lastly, I think specific life situations (such as, is this person married, a parent, caretaker for a family member, etc.) should be taken into account too. A person that has these responsibilities, likely will not commit another crime because they want to change for their loved ones.

Defend or critique the strategy of matching the inmate to the correctional facility as a response to the legal concept of cruel and unusual punishment. Provide a rationale for your position with concrete examples.

For the most part, I do agree with how inmates are matched to their correctional facility. There is a level for everything, which makes sense. Having a white collar criminal in a prison with murders makes no sense at all. White collar criminals could easily be forced into participating into bad activities, just because they are worried about their safety. It makes sense to keep certain levels of criminals together in I do believe that a lot of programs that are offered are worth the tax payer’s money; extra officers are definitely necessary, especially in high security prisons for everyone’s safety.

Also, programs such as counseling and therapy for the inmates is also worth tax payers money; these programs allow inmates, that might have the chance of being release and on the streets again, to work on themselves and in turn become better people before they are free to roam. I also think programs such as building gardens for inmates is worth the money too. Learning how to do such things can allow to inmates to pick up a trade, someone they might have never know they were any good at, and they can then use this to help them build themselves once back on the streets. There are certain things, like TV, that I do not feel are necessary, as I see this is a luxury, which is not something you should have while in jail.

References

1. Siegel, L. J., & Worrall, J. L. (2013) Essentials of criminal justice , Belmont, CA 2. Jurisville, weeks 8-10

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