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Tour De Georgia and HR Data Essay Sample

Tour De Georgia and HR Data Pages
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INTRODUCTION

The aim is to prepare a briefing for the new HR Director, who has requested the review of the organisation’s approach to collecting, storing, and using HR data. In the first two sections (1 and 2), I will explain what type of data is collected and what is the reason behind it. In the last part (3) I will present report and short analyses of the data available at my organisation.

FINDINGS

1.1 WHY ORGANISATIONS NEEDS TO COLLECT AND RECORD DATA?

Organisations needs to collect data about their employees to comply with legal and industry requirements such as Data Protection Act (1998), Freedom of Information Act (2000), Health and Social Care Act (2008) or Equality and Diversity Act (2010). Data is collected to enable HR effectively and appropriately proceed with personnel administration and to support broad HR strategies. HR needs to collect basic data for the purpose of:

Recording (payroll, pensions, benefits)
Planning (development, training, budget)
Measuring and monitoring (appraisals, employee turnover)
Controlling (to determine progress or lack of it)
Decision making (strategic – tactical – operational)

1.2 RANGE OF HR DATA THAT ORGANISATIONS COLLECT, HOW THIS SUPPORT HR PRACTICE?

HR records include wide range of data relating to individuals working in the organisation:

Recruitment and selection
Pay and reward
Development
Maternity/paternity (leave and pay)
Redundancies
Health and safety
Policies and contracts
Absence lists (sick leave and annual leave)
Diversity and equal opportunities

There are various reasons behind storing data to support HR practice: to identify pattern of staff absence and monitor productivity, to recognize gaps for training and development plans, to enable HR to deliver service and advice on decision making. All data is stored electronically, password protected and accessible to authorised HR and senior managers. Information’s on employees are stored mainly to perform administrative duties, monitor absence, process payroll and benefits. Recently, the company improved development and reward program and carried regular appraisals which increased amount of data that need to be collected and retained for certain period of time.

2.1 DIFFERENT METHODS FOR RECORDING AND STORING HR DATA.

There are two main methods for recording and storing HR data: Manual method, like storing paper documents in locked cabinet; is one of the older methods, yet, simple and good for keeping original copies of contracts, personnel agreements, where hand signature is required; will also have records of older data related to previous employees or these with many years of service Electronic method, such as HRIS (Human Resources Information System) is modern and extensively used by organisation due to adaptability and high security level. As more information need to be captured by employers, the HRIS allows organisations to effectively store and analyse this data, gives ability to manipulate, update and maintain employee records for analysis and interpretations purposes.

2.2 LEGAL REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO THE RECORDING, STORAGE AND ACCESSIBILITY OF DATA.

By collecting data on company’s workforce, HR departments are able to analyse details and take appropriate actions to avoid implications with law or industry regulating authorities. Two main legislations are:

a) Data protection Act (1998) – DPA ‘It is the main piece of legislation that governs the protection of personal data in the UK.’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_Protection_Act_1998). There are 8 principles that need to be adhered:

 used fairly and lawfully  for specifically stated purpose  be adequate, relevant and not excessive  must be accurate  kept for no longer than necessary  handled according to data protection rights  kept safe and secure  not transferred outside the UK without adequate protection

b) Freedom of Information Act (2000) – FOI ‘provides public access to information held by public authorities. It does this in two ways: public authorities are obliged to publish certain information about their activities; and members of the public are entitled to request information from public authorities.’ (https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-freedom-of-information/what-is-the-foi-act/)

3.1 ANALYSE AND INTERPRET HR DATA.

The HR data that I have chosen to investigate is Staff Satisfaction Survey. The reason we decided to participate in a staff survey was because the company was expanding rapidly and we wanted to ensure that we continue to have a happy workforce. We realised the best way to do this is by encouraging feedback from our staff.

We created the survey using third-party technology and adapt their templates to suit our needs. Results were to remain anonymous, to encourage the participants to be more truthful, which will add value to our findings. Outcome was automatically collated and shown in percentages and in numbers giving also an average answer to each question.

Our survey consisted of five sections – Job Satisfaction, Job Fulfilment, Training and Development, Employee Engagement and optional comments at the end. We asked 30 questions with option of choosing a rating from 1 to 5. We received 21 responses which at the time was total number of participants.

3.2 PRESENT FINDINGS IN CLEAR, MEANINGFUL MANNER TO INFORM DECISION-MAKING.

Throughout the survey we noticed a variety of trends. The biggest similarity was the majority of participants that felt their views were listened also felt that their manager was doing well in their job. This show’s a positive correlation between the two. We also find that 90% of our staff felt well informed on how the company is doing.

After analysing the results of the survey we concluded that Training and Development seem to be the weakest area within the organisation and the strongest to be our openness and involvement of staff in the day to day operation of the company and in its future going forward.

We have decided that in order to monitor and keep up to date with our staff satisfaction level we will conduct similar surveys on annual basis. Overall we found the survey beneficial not only to understand how our employees feel
but also to give a greater idea where improvements can be made.

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