Edit this essay
only $12.90/page

Woman’s Rights Movement Essay Sample

Woman’s Rights Movement Pages
Pages: Word count: Rewriting Possibility: % ()

On August 18, 1920 after battling congress for nearly 100 years, congress passed one of the biggest events for women in history, the 19th amendment which gave women the right to vote, and to be equal in society to men. Many women believed that there were better opportunities for education and employment, which gave them a better incentive to strive for woman’s rights. Women used their talents and skills to make better life for themselves, family and community. During the battle for their rights, woman became better known for their political enforcement by campaigning for what they believed in. In the time period between 1600-1800’s women had very few rights in America. After the Declaration of Independence was penned and signed in 1776, woman were disregarded from the saying “All Men were Created Equal”.

Women weren’t treated like people they were property, house women, they had no right to vote like men could, couldn’t attend college, work at a professional company, or gain the right of their own children if their husband had divorced them. In 1848 the first woman’s rights convention took place in America. The convention was held at Seneca Falls and led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. Mott was a leading abolitionist who organized several different antislavery groups and conventions. The convention’s major outcome was the Seneca Falls Declaration written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The Declaration was appointed to 100 people, 68 were woman and 32 were men. This document was created so that all women were created equal.

After the first convention happened in Seneca Falls, many other organizations took place fighting for women rights: National Woman suffrage Association (NWSA), American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), and in time the combination of the two groups form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). NAWSA was under leadership by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony was president of the organization. The NWSA campaigned for the right to vote and have that stated in the constitution, which the AWSA campaigned state-by-state for the right to vote. Susan B. Anthony was an American reformer. She vouched her statements on woman’s rights in front of every congress in America. Susan B. Anthony gave a speech to congress and stated: “One-Half of the people of this nation to-day are utterly powerless to blot from the statue books an unjust law, or to write a new and a just one.

The women, dissatisfied as they are with this form of government, that enforces taxation without representation- that compels them to obey laws to which they have never given their consent-that imprisons and hangs then without a trial by a jury of their peers, that robs them, in marriage, of their custody of their own persons, wages and children-are this half of the people left wholly at the mercy of the other half, in direct violation of the spirit and letter of the declarations of the framers of this government, every one of which was based on the immutable principle of equal rights to all.” As months went by, her and her sisters had an idea to sign up to vote; weeks later they were arrested for unwittingly voting in Rochester New York. The trial that she had didn’t go as well as

hoped. The judge forced her to remain silent and fined her. She refused to pay the fine and lost every chance of appealing her case to the Supreme Court. In the 1900’s women tried to work outside of their homes, they struggled to find jobs, but as men left for the war women and children were offered their jobs in factories. Work hours could get extremely long, 12 hour shifts at a minimum. There were laws against women working, if they could actually find a job they were only allowed to work up to 8 hour shift, weren’t allowed to work at night and they were sometimes forced to work overtime without being paid. Since the year 1878 congress introduced the drafting of the 19th amendment. After many years of women campaigning Congress decided to pass the 19th amendment in August of 1920.

The 19th amendment is an amendment to the constitution giving women the right to vote and no state can deny the ballet of a women vote. Some people would agree and disagree if society has changed for women today. Yes, women have the right to vote, own property, have a full time job, go to school, and become anything they want to be or have dreamed to be. Women like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are an inspiration to young women because they worked hard for what they believe in, and didn’t take no for an answer. But, women in society today are still treated differently.

In some cases men get rewarded for their actions, when women or young girls get called names and accused for things they never did. In reality, many things have changed for women since the 1900’s. Michelle Bachelet stated about Susan B. Anthony:  “Freedom makes a huge requirement of every human being. With freedom comes responsibility. You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stio to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, “I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along”

Search For The related topics

  • women