Analysis of Stock Ordering for Henley Ice Cream Parlour Essay Sample

Analysis of Stock Ordering for Henley Ice Cream Parlour Pages
Pages: Word count: Rewriting Possibility: % ()

1. What is the name of the organisation? Henley Ice Cream Parlour

2. What does it do? Sells ice cream to the general public at the shop. There are also tearooms at the shop. The ice cream is also supplied to local businesses for retail.

3. Where is it located? Henley-in-Arden

4. How many people does it employ? There are two full-time members of staff and 9 part-time.

5. How many shops are there? One

6. What are the names and positions held of people who are going to be involved with the project? Cindy Brittan – Owner

Emily Brittan – Sales and Marketing Manager

The specific area of the company that I will be looking at for the project is stock ordering. It is linked to the rest of the organisation as follows:

As it is a very small company many of the departments overlap and are managed by the same people. All decisions are made centrally by the owner. There is also outside influences such as the two manufacturers of the ice cream.

Initial Statement of Problem

The current system used for ordering ice cream from the manufacturer is paper based. Each week the remaining ice cream in the cold store is counted physically counted and recorded manually. Many problems arise from this, as the system is not reliable. A computerised system is required to increase accuracy.

The Current System

Fact Finding – Transcript of first interview with Emily Brittan

1. What data is collected for processing? The stock levels of the ice cream available for use in the shop or to be sold to customers.

2. How does this data originate and how is it collected? The data originates form ice cream sales and is collected manually.

3. How often is it collected? Weekly

4. How is it processed? Manually

5. Who processes it? Cindy Brittan or Emily Brittan

6. How often is it processed? Weekly

7. Is the data processed in batch mode or on demand? On demand.

8. What information is produced? The quantity of ice cream that needs to be ordered from the manufacturer.

9. Who receives the information? The manufacturer

10. How is it transmitted/presented? A telephone call.

11. How often is the information provided? Usually weekly but during busy times more than one order may be made in a week.

12. What is the information used for? It is used to put together an order for the shop.

13. How reliable and accurate is the data? Not very accurate as tubs of ice cream may have been put in the wrong box, boxes may be counted twice or not counted at all.

14. Is the information presented clearly so that it can be understood? No, there is not enough lines on the page on which the information is recorded so is easily misinterpreted.

15. What master file/reference files are kept, and how often are they updated? The data is compiled in an order book. When the ice cream is delivered, the invoices are also kept.

16. What does the system cost to operate? Costs include the wages paid to the employee who counts the ice cream; the price of the phone call and the price of the paper information is recorded on. The approximate cost of this is �163.80 a year.

17. What benefits does the system provide? None.

Analysis of Current System

There are many disadvantages with the current system:

* It is very time consuming as all input, output and processing is carried out manually.

* There is a loss of stock, as some ice cream may not be counted; it is then reordered so there is too much stock, which is then wasted.

* No comparisons can be made, as the reference data is unclear.

* It uses a lot of paper.

Data Flow in Current System

Record Order

Remaining ice

cream

Invoice and Phone

delivery call

File invoice

Order details Valid order

Restatement of Problem

The problem is:

* The current paper based system is time consuming.

Evidence: Question 4 from interview: How is it processed? Manually

* The system is not accurate or very reliable.

Evidence: Question 13 from interview: How reliable and accurate is the data? Not very accurate as tubs of ice cream may have been put in the wrong box, boxes may be counted twice or not counted at all.

* It is difficult to make comparisons of ice cream sales over a specified period of time.

Evidence: Question 14 from interview: Is the information presented clearly so that it can be understood? No, there is not enough lines on the page on which the information is recorded so is easily misinterpreted.

* There are more disadvantages that advantages with the current system.

Evidence: Question 17 from interview: What benefits does the system provide? None.

Justification of Methods of Fact Finding

The methods I used to investigate the current system and the requirements of its users were an interview with Emily Brittan, the Sales and Marketing Manager, who also works in the shop. The interview considered the system from both perspectives – what information is required from a sales point of view and the difficulties experienced by all members of staff working in the shop. I also observed the current system in use, enabling me to draw my own conclusions on its effectiveness and to see first hand its problems and how it could be improved.

Fact Recording – Transcript from the second interview with Emily Brittan

1. Who is the ice cream supplied to?

The ice cream is sold through our shop and is also sold for retail at other local shops and restaurants.

2. How many different flavours of ice cream are there?

Approximately 30.

3. Do you keep the same ice cream flavours?

No, we introduce new flavours and also have ‘seasonal’ offers.

4. What different sizes do you order the ice cream in?

1-litre, 2.5-litre, 4-litre and napolis. There is also two different grades of ice cream.

5. Who supplies the ice cream?

Two different manufacturers supply it

6. What problems have you encountered with the current system?

* Unsure of stock levels as the ice cream is manually counted so mistakes are made.

* Customers (e.g. other shops) may order ice cream, which is not available.

* Not enough ingredients labels to put on the 4-litre tubs in stock.

* Stock rotation-some ice cream is ‘forgotten’ about and reaches its sell-by date.

* Time consuming as each tub of ice cream is counted manually.

* The order book is unclear as there are not enough lines on the page.

* Uses a lot of paper.

* No comparisons can be made.

* As is it a time consuming process the wage costs are higher.

* Loss of stock – some ice cream is not counted as more is ordered; there is then too much so it isn’t all used.

7. What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels?

* What flavours, in what size, have been used.

* The number of each flavour, in each size, that have been used each week.

* The flavours and sizes of ice cream that has been sent to customers.

* The most popular flavour each week.

* The least popular flavour each week.

* The total amount of ice cream sold each month

* The total amount of ice cream sold each year.

* How many 1-litre tubs are returned to the manufacturer each month.

* How many 4-litre tubs are returned to the manufacturer each month.

* What ice cream is taken to outside events.

* The amount of ice cream sold at an outside event in order to determine its success.

* The amount of ice cream sold at the shop.

* The amount of ice cream sold at each of the local shops.

* How much ice cream has been given away through raffle prizes etc.

8. What software do you have?

Microsoft programs such as Excel and Word.

9. What operating system do you use?

Microsoft Window 98

10. Are the computers networked?

No.

11. How would you like your system to be presented?

* Has to be user friendly

* Use of colour e.g. red to indicate lack of stock.

12. Do you need to produce any paper-based records?

* Printouts with information on stock levels

* Printouts detailing the quantity of ice cream that has been ordered from the manufacturer, to compare with what is delivered.

* Need a paper-based method of recording what ice cream is delivered, the delivered ice cream will then be checked off against the invoice and entered into the computer.

13. What stock needs to be monitored?

* Ice cream – 1-litre, 2.5-litre, 4-litre and napolis.

* Labels for 4-litre tubs.

* Scones and teacakes as they are stored in the same freezer; to enable space allocation.

* Bubble wrap bags which are supplied with each 1-litre tub that is sold in the shop.

14. Will the data be archived?

* Yes, yes once a year onto floppy disk. It doesn’t need to be done more often as the data used in sales analysis needs to be current.

* We would also like a list with the compiled sales figures of the year to be printed out.

15. Is there any other information you would like to store on the system?

* Ingredients listing for all the ice cream flavours and the manufacturer.

* Customer details such as contact number, delivery details, previous orders etc.

Observation

* It takes two people 30 minutes to manually count the remaining ice cream tubs in the cold store each week.

* The numbers are totalled and recorded in the order book.

* It is then decided what ice cream will be ordered; this is also recorded in the order book.

* A phone call is then made to the manufacturer and the order is made.

* The ice cream is then delivered 2-3 days later.

* When the ice cream is delivered, each box is labelled with what is inside, and then checked off against the invoice.

* The ice cream is then moved into the cold store.

* The stock freezer in the shop is filled up once a week with napolis from the cold store. If the stock freezer runs out it is filled up again with napolis from the cold store.

* The 1-litre freezer is also filled up once a week with the 1-litres from the cold store.

* 1-litre and 4-litre tubs are also sent to other shops that sell the ice cream.

* 4-litre tubs may also be taken directly out of the cold store to be sold in the shop.

Analysis of Data

Requirements Specification

1. To be able to see the remaining stock levels of each flavour, in all sizes, at the end of the week.

Evidence: Question 6 from second interview – What problems have you encountered with the current system? Unsure of stock levels as the ice cream is manually counted so mistakes are made.

2. To produce in the form of a graph/table what flavours, in what size, have been used.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The number of each flavour, in each size, that have been used each week.

3. To show clearly the ice cream flavours and sizes have been sent to customers.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The flavours and sizes of ice cream that has been sent to customers.

4. To be compatible with Microsoft Office 98 programs such as Excel.

Evidence: Question 8 from second interview – What software do you have? Microsoft programs such as Excel and Word.

5. To use appropriate error messages.

Evidence: Question 11 from second interview – How would you like your system to be presenter? Has to be user friendly

6. To have a readable and easy to understand user guide.

Evidence: Question 11 from second interview – How would you like your system to be presenter? Has to be user friendly

7. To have buttons that are labelled appropriately to perform more complex actions.

Evidence: Question 11 from second interview – How would you like your system to be presenter? Has to be user friendly

8. To be clear and concise so that figures such as stock levels are readily available.

Evidence: Question 11 from second interview – How would you like your system to be presenter? Has to be user friendly

Question 6 from second interview – What problems have you encountered with the current system? Unsure of stock levels as the ice cream is manually counted so mistakes are made.

9. To indicate using colour e.g. red if there is not enough stock.

Evidence: Question 11 from second interview – How would you like your system to be presented? Use of colour e.g. red to indicate lack of stock.

10. To use error messages to indicate whether stock has already been allocated.

Evidence: Question 6 from second interview – What problems have you encountered with the current system? Customers (e.g. other shops), may order ice cream, which is not available.

11. To show in the form of a table the flavour that has been the most popular each week.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The most popular flavour each week.

12. To show in the form of a table the flavour that has been the least popular each week.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The least popular flavour each week.

13. To calculate the total quantity of ice cream sold each month.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The total amount of ice cream sold each month.

14. To calculate the total quantity of ice cream sold each year.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The total amount of ice cream sold each year.

15. To printout required data on stock levels in a readable form.

Evidence: Question 12 from second interview – Do you need to produce any paper-based records? Printouts with information on stock levels.

16. To produce a printout to show the number of returned 1-litre tubs, in each flavour, every month.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? How many 1-litre tubs are returned to the manufacturer each month.

17. To produce a printout to show the number of returned 4-litre tubs, in each flavour, every month.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? How many 4-litre tubs are returned to the manufacturer each month.

18. To record the number of labels for 4-litre tubs remaining and indicate through an error message when stock levels are low.

Evidence: Question 13 from second interview – What stock needs to be monitored? Labels for 4-litre tubs.

19. To indicate using an error message when there is not enough labels to put on the 4-litre tubs in stock.

Evidence: Question 6 from second interview – What problems have you encountered with the current system? Not enough ingredients labels to put on the 4-litre tubs.

20. To record the use-by date for all flavours of ice cream that enters the shop, using a form.

Evidence: Question 6 from second interview – What problems have you encountered with the current system? Stock rotation-some ice cream is ‘forgotten’ about and reaches its sell-by date.

21. To notify, using an error message, when the ice cream is within 1 month of its use-by date.

Evidence: Question 6 from second interview – What problems have you encountered with the current system? Stock rotation-some ice cream is ‘forgotten’ about and reaches its sell-by date.

22. To record, using a form, the ice cream flavours, in each size, that have been taken to an exhibition.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? What ice cream is taken to outside events.

23. To analyse and present sales data from exhibitions in the form of a graph/table.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The amount of ice cream sold at an outside event in order to determine its success.

24. To record, using a form, the ice cream flavours, in each size, that have been taken to an event.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? What ice cream is taken to outside events.

25. To analyse and present sales data from events in the form of a graph/table.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The amount of ice cream sold at an outside event in order to determine its success.

26. To record, using a form, the ice cream flavours, in each size, that have been taken to a farmer’s market.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? What ice cream is taken to outside events.

27. To analyse and present sales data from farmer’s markets in the form of a graph/table.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The amount of ice cream sold at an outside event in order to determine its success.

28. To have an easy to use paper format to record the delivery details before being entered onto the system.

Evidence: Question 12 from second interview – Do you need to produce any paper-based records? Need a paper-based method of recording what ice cream has been delivered.

29. To have two different interfaces for the two manufacturers.

Evidence: Question 5 from second interview – Who supplies the ice cream? Two different manufacturers supply it.

30. To archive data onto a floppy disk annually.

Evidence: Question 14 from second interview – Will the data be archived? Yes, once a year onto floppy disk.

31. To printout backup copies of compiled data.

Evidence: Question 14 from second interview – Will the data be archived? We would also like a list with the compiled sales figures of the year to be printed out.

32. To monitor the number of scones and teacakes in the cold store.

Evidence: Question 13 from the second interview – What stock needs to be monitored? Scones and teacakes as they are stored in the cold store; to enable space allocation.

33. To analyse and present sales data from the shop in the form of a graph/table.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The amount of ice cream sold at the shop.

34. To show product information e.g. ingredients listing, when a flavour is selected.

Evidence: Question 15 from second interview – Is there any other information you would like to store on the system? Ingredients listing for all the ice cream flavours and the manufacturer.

35. To add new flavours to the system.

Evidence: Question 3 from second interview – Do you keep the same ice cream flavours? No, we introduce new flavours and also have ‘seasonal’ offers.

36. To store information on the individual shops supplied with ice cream.

Evidence: Question 15 from second interview – Is there any other information you would like to store on the system? Customer details such as contact number, delivery details, previous orders etc.

37. To analyse and present sales data from each shop in the form of a graph/table.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? The amount of ice cream sold at each of the local shops.

38. To monitor the number of bubble wrap bags, using the sales data from 1-litre tubs, and to indicate when they need to be reordered.

Evidence: Question 13 from second interview – What stock needs to be monitored? Bubble wrap bags which are supplied with each 1-litre tub that is sold in the shop.

39. To printout what ice cream has been ordered from the manufacturer.

Evidence: Question 12 from second interview – Do you need to produce any paper-based records? Printouts detailing the quantity of ice cream that has been ordered from the manufacturer, to compare with what is delivered.

40. To show how much ice cream is given away through raffle prizes etc.

Evidence: Question 7 from second interview – What information do you require to be produced using the data on stock levels? How much ice cream has been given away through raffle prizes etc.

Alternative Approaches

1. A better organised paper based system. This would involve:

* Using a clearer table to record the amount of ice cream in the cold store.

* Recording ice cream as it leaves the cold store.

The benefits of this system are:

* User does not need to be computer literate.

* Wage costs are lower as it is less time consuming.

The costs of this system may be higher because more paper would be used; which in turn will require more storage space.

It would also be difficult to analyse the sales data, as all the different sheets of paper referring to sales would have to be gathered and processed manually.

Search For The related topics

  • stock
  • Olivia from Bla Bla Writing

    Hi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one? Check it out https://goo.gl/3EfTOL

    sample
    Haven't found the Essay You Want?
    GET YOUR CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE
    For Only $13.90/page