We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

How did the Vietnam War Have an Impact on Canada? Essay Sample

essay
  • Pages: 6
  • Word count: 1,412
  • Rewriting Possibility: 99% (excellent)
  • Category: vietnam

Get Full Essay

Get access to this section to get all help you need with your essay and educational issues.

Get Access

Introduction of TOPIC

The Vietnam War was the most gruelling and unpopular war in America history. It resulted in nearly 60 000 American deaths and an estimated 2 million Vietnamese deaths.1 The war started in 1956 after Vietnam had gained its independence from France. Vietnam was temporarily divided between the north and the south. The south was anti-communist, and thus supported by the United States (US) and the North was a communist state, supported by The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). In 1956, South Vietnam had denied to hold the unification elections.

By 1958, the Viet Cong in the north had begun to attack the South Vietnamese Government. By 1966, America had employed 190,000 US troops in Vietnam. The indirect cost of the war had been 140 billion dollars while the estimated indirect costs of this war have been 900 billion dollars.The reason Canada did not go to war in Vietnam was because Canada did not adopt the Truman and Eisenhower Doctrines.2 Canada did not agree that communism must be actively opposed through foreign intervention. Instead, Canada held that illegal acts of international aggression must be opposed under a United Nations resolution.Although Canada did not directly get involved in the Vietnam War, it was still impacted economically, socially and militarily.

The Vietnam War impacted Canada economically, because of war materials, produced in Canada, that were sold to the United States. Canada had supplied 2.5 billion dollars of war materials to the United States and an additional 10 billion dollars in food, beverages, berets and boots for the troops was exported to the US, as well as nickel, copper, lead, and oil for shell casings, wiring, plate armour and military transport3. This had affected Canada because it allowed the economy to boom. The unemployment rate in Canada during the Vietnam War had been at an all time low of 3.6%. This was direct occurrence of companies hiring individuals to keep up with American demands. The unemployment rate in Canada during that time gives evidence to show that Canada had indeed been affected economically . Furthermore, American firms invested an additional 1 billion dollars in Canadian Companies to allow them to expand and keep supplying the US with war materials. Canada had also been affected militarily by the Vietnam War.

Although the Canadian Armed Forces were not engaged in total war in Vietnam, the Canadian military was affected by the war in Vietnam. Canadian and US defence departments had worked together to test “Agent Orange”. “Agent Orange” is the code name for one of defoliants used in the Vietnam War. 80,000,000 litres of this defoliant were sprayed across Vietnam.4 The goal was to defoliate forested and rural land so they could deprive the guerrillas of their cover. “A recently released report states that in June 1966, the American army tested Agent Orange at Base Gagetown in New Brunswick”5. Another reason the Vietnam War had affected Canadian Armed Forces was that many

soldiers had volunteered to fight in Vietnam with the United States. As many as 30 000 soldiers had

Sorry, but full essay samples are available only for registered users

Choose a Membership Plan
volunteered to fight along with US troops. Even though many Canadian soldiers had volunteered to fight in the Vietnam War, Many citizens did not agree with the conscription policies and thus fled to Canada.

The Vietnam War also affected Canada socially. Nearly 60 000 young men had come to Canada to seek refuge.6 They were known as “Draft Dodgers”. “Draft-Dodgers” is a term that refers to a person who avoids the conscription policies of the nation he or she resides in by leaving the country or going into hiding. Many of these men did not want to fight for the war effort in Vietnam and hence came to Canada to seek refuge. This had affected Canada socially because many people were entering the country in a short period of time. In addition, many American men who were enlisted in the US army came to Canada to seek refuge. They were known as Deserters. These men had abandoned the US military and made their way to Canada. The men who had deserted the US army have still not been pardoned and are able to face jail time if caught within the US.

An example of this was the case of Richard Allen Shields. Shields had deserted the US army in 1972 after serving for one year in Vietnam. When Shields travelled to the US in 2000, 28 years later, he was arrested and jailed in the state of Washington.7 The discrimination against US army deserters made by the Canadian Government was removed in May of 1969 under the Government of Pierre Trudeau. The government was reluctant to make this decision and in early 1969 Pierre Trudeau claimed: “Surely a person who deserts from the armed forces of the US is guilty of a criminal offence and accordingly would be inadmissible to Canada on that ground alone.”8. This was a result of student activism in Canada, against the Vietnam War and in support of deserters, and extensive pressure by the New Democratic Party (NDP) at the time. This had affected Canada socially because it was the first time an activist group had influenced a decision made by the Canadian Government.

Canada had been impacted by the Vietnam War since it was a major distributor in war materials used in Vietnam, which had a great impact on Canada’s economy. Many soldiers volunteered to fight in the war alongside US troops and the Canadian Defence department had worked to test a major defoliant used in Vietnam which caused Canada to be affected militarily. As Many as 60000 Draft Dodgers had come to Canada and the deserters of the vietnam war had influenced immigration policies in Canada. Canada had been affected greatly by the Vietnam War although they did not participate directly in it.

Works Cited

” BBC NEWS | Americas | US deserter’s Canadian campaign .” BBC News – Home. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3867481.stm (accessed May 22, 2011).

“Canada’s Secret War: Vietnam | CBC Archives.” CBC Archives. http://archives.cbc.ca/war_conflict/vietnam_war/topics/1413-9128/ (accessed May 22, 2011).

Jones, Joseph . “Historical Notes on Vietnam War Resisters in Canada.” Welcome to the UBC Library – www.library.ubc.ca. http://www.library.ubc.ca/jones/hstrnt.html (accessed May 22, 2011).

Levant, Victor . “Vietnam War – The Canadian Encyclopedia.” The Canadian Encyclopedia. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0008367 (accessed May 22, 2011).

Pellow, David Naguib. Resisting global toxics: transnational movements for environmental justice. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007.

“Richard Allen Shields | Veteran Won’t Face Trial for Desertion – Los Angeles Times.” Featured Articles From The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/2000/apr/09/news/mn-17670 (accessed May 22, 2011).

“The Vietnam War.” Digital History. http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/modules/vietnam/index.cfm (accessed May 22, 2011).

“What was the Truman Doctrine?.” GCSE Modern World History. http://www.johndclare.net/EC8.htm (accessed May 22, 2011).

1 “The Vietnam War.” Digital History. Web. 22 May 2011.

<http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/modules/vietnam/index.cfm>

2 “What was the Truman Doctrine?.” GCSE Modern World History. http://www.johndclare.net/EC8.htm (accessed May 22, 2011).

3 Levant, Victor . “Vietnam War – The Canadian Encyclopedia.” The Canadian Encyclopedia. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0008367 (accessed May 22, 2011).

4 Pellow, David Naguib. Resisting global toxics: transnational movements for environmental justice. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007.

5″Canada’s Secret War: Vietnam | CBC Archives.” CBC Archives. http://archives.cbc.ca/war_conflict/vietnam_war/topics/1413-9128/ (accessed May 22, 2011).

6BBC NEWS | Americas | US deserter’s Canadian campaign .” BBC News – Home. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3867481.stm (accessed May 22, 2011).

7″Richard Allen Shields | Veteran Won’t Face Trial for Desertion – Los Angeles Times.” Featured Articles From The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/2000/apr/09/news/mn-17670 (accessed May 22, 2011).

8Jones, Joseph . “Historical Notes on Vietnam War Resisters in Canada.” Welcome to the UBC Library – www.library.ubc.ca. http://www.library.ubc.ca/jones/hstrnt.html (accessed May 22, 2011).

We can write a custom essay on

How did the Vietnam War Have an Impact on Canada? ...
According to Your Specific Requirements.

Order an essay

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

How Far Was the Tet Offensive a...

In January 1968 during the Vietnamese festivities of the Tet, the communist forces launched a series of attacks on key cities and towns throughout South Vietnam. It has been argued that this is the turning point in the war however, this point of view may have been overplayed and other factors should be taken into account to explain the changes in the war after this date if there were any. The Tet offensive had a psychological effect on popular public opinion in America and made people realise that the war was not being easily won. This was particularly highlighted by the televising of the Vietcong attack on the American embassy in Saigon. This symbolised the potential vulnerability of America's position in Vietnam. As a consequence President Johnson's approval rating plummeted as Americans lost faith in Johnson's ability to win the war. This change in public opinion was to have a...

The Vietnam War

* Total U.S. bomb tonnage dropped during: World War II = 2 057 244 tons Vietnam War = 7 078 032 tons (3.44 times as much as WWII) * Bomb tonnage dropped during the Vietnam War amounted to 1 000 lbs. for every man, woman and child in Vietnam. * An estimated 70 000 draft evaders and "dodgers" were living in Canada by 1972. * A Cornell University study placed the over-all total U.S. cost of the Vietnam war at $200 Billion * 30 April 1969 - Peak US troop strength 543 000 * Approximately 12,000 helicopters saw action in Vietnam * 9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the Vietnam era (August 5, 1964 - May 7, 1975). * 8,744,000 GIs were on active duty during the war (August 5, 1964 - March 28, 1973). * Married men killed: 17,539. * 61% of the men killed were 21...

Crises and Events Helped Shape the Characteristics...

Many actions were taken by Ho Chi Minh in order to express his identity. Ho Chi Minh was born into a peasant class family in Vietnam. He would become a dedicated communist and nationalist after his experiences in France in 1917 and also through his Vietnamese heritage. This included the Chinese rule and French colonisation of Vietnam. His peasantry status and nationalist father also contributed to his nationalist and communist identity. Ho Chi Minh expressed his identity in the formation of the Vietminh, an organised group of Vietnamese who also shared the same beliefs as Ho Chi Minh. The partaking in battles during Japanese occupation, the first Indochina war also shows Ho Chi Minh's dedication to nationalism. The formation of yet another group, the Vietcong, was another expression of Ho's beliefs in nationalism. One event was when the Chinese ruled Vietnam for close to a thousand years, they introduced Confucianism...

Popular Essays

logo

Emma Taylor

online

Hi there!
Would you like to get such a paper?
How about getting a customized one?