Personal Exercise Program Essay Sample

Personal Exercise Program Pages
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Facilities

Tennis courts, Badminton courts, Squash courts, Hockey pitch, Cricket net, Weight Training facilities.

My aim of this Programme

My main aim in this programme is try to improve the strength of my arms. I notice that my arms are letting me down in a lot of ways, so I decide to strength up my arms. This is also because not just only will improve me in swimming, it will improve every sport I do.

Purpose of warm up

It is imperative to perform a warm up or serious injuries could be incurred. Warm up help you to be prepared for exercise, by increasing of speed the oxygen release to the muscle, and raising the heart rate and the body temperature. Stretches are also one type of warm up.

The muscle works better while it is warm up in several reasons.

* The release of adrenaline will increase heart rate and dilate capillaries, which in turn enable greater amounts and increased the pace of oxygen delivery to the muscle.

* Increase muscle temperatures associated with exercise will facilitate enzyme activity; this increases muscle metabolism and therefore ensures a readily available supply of energy.

* Increase production of synovial fluid ensures efficient movement at the joints.

* Warm ups could also increase in the speed of nerve impulse conduction.

* Increased temperature can also enables greater extensibility and elasticity of muscle fibres.

* It lowers blood pressure

A warm-up designed to prepare you to swim your best, whether in a meet or practice, will have you more ready if it goes beyond simple physiology.

In 1977, Swedish researchers Astrand and Rodahl found that muscle cell metabolism and the rate of oxygen exchange from the bloodstream to muscle tissue increase 13 percent for every degree of muscle temperature increase. As it warms, muscle tissue also becomes suppler, reducing the risk of strains and tears. Yet typical water temperature is usually 15 to 20 degrees lower than our body temperature, meaning your first plunge can actually have a chilling effect on your muscles, constricting blood vessels and reducing circulation for the first few minutes. This can cause binding of muscle tissue and an increase in lactic acid levels. A few minutes of light calisthenics before entering the water will increase your body’s resistance to that initial shock. Simply increasing the energy level of the range-of-motion exercises suggested above can do that nicely.

Get into the flow and feel of the water. Your first five to ten minutes of swimming should be lazy, fluid, and exploratory. Concentrate exclusively on how you’re feeling as you gradually increase intensity. Change strokes frequently to get more joints and muscle groups lubricated. My practices always start with a repeated cycle of one lap free, one back and one breast (I excuse myself from fly until after warm-up), for 5 or 10 minutes. Next, I alternate drill and swim laps for a while to begin to tune up the neuromuscular system. Martial artist Bruce Lee wrote that fine skills should be practiced only when your muscles are fresh. Skilful swimming requires very precise movement patterns, so it helps to do stroke drills and technique work before doing any hard work to reinforce the desired precise movement patterns of skilful swimming. Warm-up may be the most valuable time to do balance drills, because the drills establish a pattern of relaxed and fluid movement.

Another highly effective warm-up drill is “minus-cycle” swimming. Count your strokes each length and limit yourself to one less stroke cycle (2 individual arm strokes) per length than your normal stroke count. You’ll intuitively discover ways to get more out of each stroke. Your technique will improve steadily from devoting attention to it in every workout, and a technique-intensive warm-up will provide the perfect “set-up” for the harder swimming to follow.

It improves performance, helps players get mentally prepared and is a great step towards injury prevention.

A warm up and cool down are the two cardinal principles of any sport. The same is true of swimming. If you think that swimming is a slow and low impact exercise and doesn’t require warm up, then you are dead wrong. When you start swimming, without a warm up, your blood circulation, heart rate and your body as a whole are in a state of rest. If you start swimming suddenly your body has to change from a passive to an active state in a very short time. This can cause injuries and loss in efficiency. For a safe and healthy swim you need a good warm up and cool down. Even muscle stiffness would reduce considerably because of this.

To get 100% from your swimming your body has to invest a few minutes in warming up. A warm up makes your body ready for swimming and you actually swim faster and better because of it. It enables your body for a full range of motion in all the strokes. Your muscle fibbers get elongated and connective tissues that attach the muscles to the bones get ready for more vigorous activity. Although there is no hard and fast rule for warm up but generally the equation says that, more the muscle mass or age more the time you need for warm up and obviously, cool down. You not only swim better with warm up but you also reduce the chances of injuries and illness considerably.

Purpose of cool down

After exercise, you should do a similar process to be followed in order to prevent unnecessary discomfort or injuries. This is to slowing the heart rate so that the heart remains elevated. The purpose is to keep metabolic activity high, and capillaries dilated, so that oxygen can be flushed through the muscle tissue, removing and oxidising any lactic acid that remains.

The purpose of the cool-down is the reverse of the warm-up. At this point, your heart is jumping and blood is pumping furiously through your muscles. You want your body to redirect the blood flow back to normal before you do anything else. You also want your body temperature to decrease before you hop into a hot or cold shower; otherwise, you risk fainting. Cooling down prevents your blood from pooling in one place, such as your legs. When you stop exercising suddenly, your blood can quickly collect, which can lead to dizziness, nausea, and fainting. If you’re really out of shape or at high risk for heart disease, skipping a cool-down can place undue stress on your heart.

After exercise or strenuous physical activity, it is important to decrease your body temperature gradually till your normal body temperature is reached. It is just as important to include your stretching program during the cool down process to reduce soreness in your muscles the following day.

Cool-down is your recovery phase where you start to recover from the workout you just finished? It is guaranteed that if you do not cool down and stretch after a strenuous workout you will be in a lot of pain for the next couple of days. Cool-Down – the title speaks for itself, but it is still worth explaining a little more in depth. After your workout comes the cool-down; you start to breathe a little slower, lifting less weight and simply cooling down. Once you have lowered your heart rate you stretch your all your muscles – paying special attention to the muscles you’ve just worked. Each stretch should last for at least eight seconds and naturally you should hold the stretch a little longer and repeat it if the muscle feels particularly sore. Don’t over do the stretching; stretch until you feel some mild tension in the muscle.

Like warm up you also need a proper cool down. Remember your body changes its phase from active to passive and again this should not be sudden. No doubt your swim may leave you feeling exhausted but don’t just stop dead. Remember a cool down with moderate activity is better than one with very little activity. Give your body some breathing space and bring it back to normal with a gradual decrease in activity.

Always drink plenty of water BEFORE and AFTER any exercise or practice session.

Warm up actual & Cool down actual

Shoulder Roll: Lift your shoulders up. Circle them forward and down. Repeat 6-10 times.

Back Of Thigh Stretch: Put one leg in front of the other. Bend the back leg and ease back onto it – as if you were about to sit on the chair. Back straight. Feel the stretch along the back of the straight thigh. Hold for ten seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Front Of Thigh Stretch: Use chair or wall for balance. Stand on one foot with knee slightly bent and hold the other foot as shown. Ease the foot upwards until a slight stretch is felt on the front of the thigh. Hold for 10 seconds. Change legs and repeat.

Calf Stretch: Stand with one leg in front of you and bend the knee. Lean forward keeping the back leg and your back straight. Hold for 10 seconds then repeat with the other leg forward.

All Over Stretch: Stand feet shoulder width apart and knees slightly bent. Raise your arms overhead and bring hands together. Slowly begin to stretch upwards; slowly count to 10. Repeat twice

Simple stretching: While remaining at the edge of the pool put your legs on the wall and than one by one bend both knees while stretching and straightening the other knee. Hold this position for about half a minute and than repeat it with other leg.

Stretch your hamstring: is a very important part of the warm up. To do this, put one foot on the wall and the other at the bottom and straighten both knees. Hold the position again for about 30 seconds before you change the position of legs.

Quadriceps stretching: Hold the ankle of your foot with the same hand and pull it up to your butt. Remember to do it gently and hold the position for about 30 seconds before you do the same with the other ankle.

Back stretch: Your upper body is also an important area, which needs some specific stretching. Do some simple back stretching along with shoulder and arms stretching.

Remember that warm up and cool down is essential and should be done to ensure that you max your swim and fitness levels.

THE KEYS TO EFFECTIVE STRETCHING

Do some easy exercise before starting stretching

Breathe normally

Apply each stretch slowly – take it to where

Tension can be felt, but not pain

Hold each stretch for at least 15 seconds

Don’t bounce up and down while stretching

Repeat each stretch three times, on each side

Of the body if appropriate (e.g. both calves)

Every time I did any fitness I always use the stretches below for warm up and cool down.

Safety

Always take time to warm up and stretch. Research studies have shown that cold muscles are more prone to injury. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling or running or walking in place for 3 to 5 minutes. Then slowly and gently stretch, holding each stretch for 30 seconds.

Learn how to swim and do not swim alone. Swim in supervised areas where lifeguards are present. Inexperienced swimmers should wear lifejackets in the water.

Do not attempt to swim if you are too tired, too cold, or overheated.

Avoid diving into shallow water. Each year approximately 1,000 disabling neck and back injuries occur after people went headfirst into water, which was shallow or too murky to see objects.

Swim in a pool only if you can see the bottom at the deepest point; check the shape of the full diving area to make sure it is deep enough.

Dive only off the end of a diving board. Do not run on the board, try to dive far out, or bounce more than once. Swim away from the board immediately after the dive, to allow room for the next diver. Make sure there is only one person on the board at a time.

When swimming in open water, never run and enter waves headfirst. Make sure the water is free of undercurrents and other hazards.

Do not swim in a lake or river after a storm if the water seems to be rising or if there is flooding because currents may become strong. The clarity and depth of the water may have changed, and new hazards may be present.

Check weather reports before going swimming to avoid being in the water during storms, fog, or high winds. Because water conducts electricity, being in the water during an electrical storm is dangerous.

Remember that alcohol and water don’t mix. Alcohol affects not only judgment, but it slows movement and impairs vision. It can reduce swimming skills and make it harder to stay warm.

Be knowledgeable about first aid and be able to administer it for minor injuries, such as facial cuts, bruises, or minor tendonitis, strains, or sprains.

Be prepared for emergency situations and have a plan to reach medical personnel to treat injuries such as concussions, dislocations, elbow contusions, wrist or finger sprains, and fractures

You may think that swimming is an injury free sport! In fact, many people take up swimming to recover from injuries. It is indeed enjoyable to float around gently, in a weightless, watery world but swimming can have its share of injuries. You may not find injuries such as a runner’s stress fractured shin or a skier’s torn knee cartilage but minor skirmishes are possible. In swimming, the most vulnerable part is your shoulder as it is this part that is used most vigorously. However, adequate precautions can reduce the chances of injuries significantly.

While swimming take care of your shoulder joint as it is the most frequently and vigorously used part of your body and needs special care. Your shoulders are not actually designed for swimming continuously and if you use them this way you need to take special care to avoid injuries. Your shoulder rotates 1,200 to 1,500 times per mile while swimming. That’s a lot of shoulder rotation and the reason why shoulder pain is the most common swimming injury. The shoulder joint is built to allow arm movement in all possible directions but because of continuous use the muscles can fatigue and become overstretched, causing pain.

Incorrect stroke mechanics can also result in pain and injury. The body may not be prepared for many of the movements that you perform while swimming thus causing pain. In your enthusiasm, you may overuse your muscles leading to muscle fatigue. Fatigued muscles do a poor job of protecting their associated connective tissues, increasing the risk of damage to bone, cartilage, tendons and ligaments. Remember to always listen to your body. Pain and stiffness can be a good indication that you are doing something wrong.

For correct stroke mechanics the best thing you can do is to take advice from a good coach. A good coach improves your competitive skills as well as greatly enhances your fundamentals of swimming, corrects your biomechanics and keeps injuries at bay.

Proper warm up is another important precaution and is as essential as swimming itself because without proper warm up you are actually inviting injuries and pains. For older people a warm up is even more important and might take some more time. An easy warm up exercise is swinging your arms in small circles.

To prevent shoulder injuries do a good warm up with some stretching and other light flexibility exercises and remember to cool down after a swim. If you are a beginner, make sure that you use lifebelts and swim under supervision.

One of the most common injuries in swimming is swimmer’s shoulder. There are many reasons for the pain. Stretching and strengthening exercises help to prevent these injuries. Some muscles of the shoulder girdle tend to become shortened and tight, others that stabilise the shoulder joint tend to be become weak and need to be strengthened (dysbalance). The stretches showed below are perhaps different than with what you are familiar. If you stress the shoulder capsule by too much or overstretching, this may cause hyperflexibility. This in turn may make you more prone to injuries (impingement).

Introduction to Swimming

Water is not their natural habitat, but most people are able to float in it. Once this phenomenon is experienced, appropriate actions of the limbs will bring about the movement know as swimming. This exhilarating activity is for all, from very young to the very old, from the frail to the strong, from the physically handicapped to the athletic.

Throughout this country there is ample provision for people to swim and there are many good reason why everyone should learn to do so, as the following aims will indicate.

Survival

There are ever-present dangers near open water to be found in this country, in sea, river, lakes, canals and disused pits. Every year deaths are caused through drowning, many occurring within a few meters of safety. It is important, therefore, that all should be able to swim, in order to save themselves in an emergency. This same open water provides opportunities for a wide range of activities such as sailing, surfing, canoeing and skiing, for which swimming is a prerequisite.

Recreation

In these days of increased leisure time, the need for involvement in some kind of recreational pursuit, preferably of a physical nature, is generally recognised. Swimming provides the means and it has many advantages: –

* Ample opportunities are available in swimming pools and leisure centres;

* Little equipment is required, simply a costume and towel.

* It is comparatively inexpensive.

* It can be enjoyed in company or alone

* Age is no barrier. Babes together with parents enjoy movement in water and old people can continue to swim when other recreative pursuits might prove too strenuous.

* It allows for family participation, including any member who might be disabled.

* Membership of swimming clubs provides social opportunities as well as facilities for training and development of swimming skills.

Therapy

Swimming can be valuable in medical treatment and in general therapy for the following reasons: –

* The supportive nature of water permits the performance of gentle movement without undue tension, thereby assisting in rehabilitation after injury or illness.

* The disable and physically handicapped may take part because weight bearing is not required. Movement and travel can take travel can take place without the use of great strength and the performer is able to experience and enjoy a freedom of movement not possible out of water.

* It is particularly suited to the overweight person whose obesity is not so noticeable in water. The condition itself assists flotation and hence the ability to swim. Through exercise, heart ad blood vessels can be strengthened and in swimming, muscles can be worked and joints taken beyond their normal range. Similar movements attempted on land would be stressful.

* Swimming is an enjoyable way of keeping fit. It improves stamina and stimulates the circulatory and respiratory systems, thereby promoting a feeling of general well being.

Competition

Most people swim for reasons already stated. Some improve their skill by means of self-imposed challenges, or by preparing for various tests. For those endowed with special abilities and aptitudes there are many opportunities for participation in swimming as competitive sport. The many clubs to be found throughout the country provide training and swimming events.

Introduction to fitness training

Introduction

– 4 key elements to fitness

– Goal Setting

– 7 Steps

4 Key Elements

– Progressive Resistance

– Cardiovascular Training

– Flexibility

– Nutrition

– Benefits: youth, shape, metabolism, injury prevention

– Key: anything is better than nothing

3 Basic Principles

– Frequency

– Intensity

– Duration

– Factors to consider: recovery of muscles, Splits, intensity vs. volume, muscular threshold, cycling

Fundamental 1

– Recovery of muscles

– Splits

– Intensity vs.. Volume

– Muscular threshold

– Cycling

Fundamental 2

– Recovery of muscles

– Splits

– Intensity vs. volume

– Muscular threshold

– Cycling

Fundamental 3

– Recovery of muscles

– Splits

– Intensity vs. volume

– Muscular threshold

– Cycling

Fundamental 4

– Recovery of muscles

– Splits

– Intensity vs. volume

– Muscular threshold

– Cycling

Fundamental 5

– Recovery of muscles

– Splits

– Intensity vs. volume

– Muscular threshold

– Cycling

Flexibility

– Benefits

– Types: static, ballistic, PNF

– Frequency

– Intensity

– Duration

The principle of training

Specificity

The law of specificity suggests that my training undertaken should be relevant and appropriate to the sport for which the individual is training. For example, it would be highly inappropriate for a swimmer to carry out the majority of their training on the land. Although there are certainly benefits gained from land-based training, the majority of the training programme should involve pool-based work.

The specificity rule does not govern just the muscles; fibre type and actions used but also the energy systems, which are predominantly stressed. The energy system used in training should replicate that predominantly used in the event. The energy systems should also be stresses isolation of each other so that high intensity work (stressing the anaerobic systems) should be done in one session, whereas more aerobic and endurance based work should be completed in a separate session.

Progressive overload

This rule considers the intensity of the training session. For improvement and adaptation to occur, the training should be at an intensity where the individual feels some kind of stress and discomfort – this signifies overload and suggests that the old adage ‘no pain, no gain’ has some truth in it, especially for the elite athlete. If exercise takes place on a regular basis the body’s systems will adapt and start to copy with these stresses that have imposed. In order for further improvement to occur, the intensity of training will need to be gradually increased – this is progression and can be done by running faster, lifting heavier weights, or training for longer.

Reversibility

Also known as ‘regression’, this explains why performance deteriorates when training ceases or the intensity of training decreases for extended periods of time. Quite simply, if you don’t use it you lose it!

Seven weeks of inactivity has been shown to have the following physiological effects. Significant decreases in maximum oxygen uptake have been recorded – up to 27%, which reflects a fall in the efficiency of the cardiovascular system. In particular, increases in both blood lactate and heart rate have been shown to increase for the same intensity of exercise. Muscle mass and therefore strength also deteriorate but at a less rapid rate.

Individual differences

These suggest that the benefits of training are optimised when programmes are set to meet the needs and abilities of an individual. What may help one athlete to improve may not be successful on another. The coach must be therefore being very sympathetic to needs of the nature.

The F.I.T.T. regime

The coach may also wish to consider the F.I.T.T. regime when designing the training programme. These letters stands for:

* F = frequency of training

* I = intensity of exercise

* T = time or duration of exercise

* T = type of training

‘F’

-The frequency of training. The elite athlete will need to do some sort of training most days, depending upon the activity being undertaken. Endurance or aerobic type activities can be performed five or six times per week, but more intense or anaerobic activities such as strength work should be performed three or four times per week, as sufficient rest days are required for the body tissues to repair themselves following this high intensity work.

‘I’

-The intensity of the exercise. This also depends upon the type of training occurring, and can be quite difficult to objectively measure. For aerobic work, exercise intensity can be measured by calculating an individual’s ‘training zone’; this is represented by the training heart rate and so involves observing heart rate values, which has become much easier with the advent of the heart rate monitor.

‘T’

-The time duration that the exercise is in progress. For aerobic type activities, the athlete should be training within his/her training zone for minimum of 20-30 minutes. However duration should not be considered in isolation since intensity of training often determines the duration of the training session.

‘T”

-The type or mode of training that is undertaken.

The Fitness Test Performa

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

1 Max Bench-Press

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

100,135

Conditions

Average

Relevance to Activity

It builds up my strength of my arm muscles, which could provide me with more power in swimming.

Safety Aspects of Test

Check that the equipment is in good condition.

Put it down slowly when you have finish doing it.

Aims of Test

To improve the strength in my arm muscles.

Main Muscles Used

Agonist: A muscle that causes motion.

Antagonist: A muscle that can move the joint opposite to the movement produced by the agonist.

Target: The primary muscle intended for exercise.

Synergist: A muscle that assists another muscle to accomplish a movement.

Stabilizer: A muscle that contracts with no significant movement.

Dynamic Stabilizer: A biarticulate muscle that simultaneously shortens at the target joint and lengthens at the adjacent joint with no appreciable difference in length. Dynamic stabilizion occurs during many compound movements.

Antagonist Stabilizer: A muscle that contracts to maintain the tension potential of a biarticulate muscle at the adjacent joint. The antagonist stabilizer may be contracted throughout or at only one extreme of the movement. Also see active insufficiency.

Test Described

Sit down on bench, hold the bench and push upwards. Then slowly putting it back down. Put extra weight on. Keep doing it until you can’t push it up any more (write the high-test one that you have done).

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

Sit and Reach

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

20

Conditions

Average

Relevance to Activity

It can help me improve better tumble turn, if I improve the flexibility in me.

Safety Aspects of Test

Remember to warm up and don’t try to do it quick.

Aims of Test

It gives an indication of the flexibility of hamstrings and lower back.

Main Muscles Used

Hamstring

Test Described

Sit down on the floor with your legs out straight and feet flat against the box. Without bending your knees, bend forward with arms outstretched and push the cursor as far down as possible and hold for two seconds.

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

Chin Up

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

3

Conditions

Very Poor

Relevance to Activity

It builds up my strength of my arm muscles, which could provide me with more power in swimming.

Safety Aspects of Test

Check is there anything on the floor that can make you slip.

Aims of Test

To improve the strength of my arms.

Main Muscles Used

Biceps brachii

Test Described

Standing under the bar, then grape hold of the bar by jumping. Keep your body straight, and then start pulling yourself upwards, until your chin is above the bar then come back down.

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

Standing Long Jump

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

237m

Conditions

Good

Relevance to Activity

It builds up my strength of my leg muscles, which could provide me with more power in swimming.

Safety Aspects of Test

Be careful when you are landing.

Aims of Test

To improve the strength in my leg muscles.

Main Muscles Used

Biceps femoris, Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Achilles tendon.

Test Described

You stand with both feet together, then without any run up jump as far as you can.

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

Standing SGT Jump

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

238-285

Conditions

Very Good

Relevance to Activity

It helps sudden movement in swimming. E.g. when you are pushing of from inside the pool.

Safety Aspects of Test

Be careful when you are landing.

Aims of Test

To see the sudden power of the leg.

Main Muscles Used

Biceps femoris, Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Achilles tendon.

Test Described

You measure how high from your foot to the top of your hand when is in the air, then do the jumping with your hand touching the highest you can.

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

1 Min Rowing Test

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

296 48 average speed

Conditions

Ok

Relevance to Activity

It moves the whole body like in butterfly.

Safety Aspects of Test

Check nobody is too close to you while you are doing it.

Aims of Test

To improve the strength in my arm muscles.

Main Muscles Used

Latissimus oblique, Erector spinae, Trapezius

Test Described

Sit on the rowing machine put your hand on the puller. Then pull it towards your body by pulling the puller and stretching your legs out and go back inwards with your legs.

Fitness Test Proforma

Fitness Test

Leg Press Max

Date

15/03/2002

Performance

290, 525

Conditions

Very Good

Relevance to Activity

It builds up my strength of my leg muscles, which could provide me with more power in swimming.

Safety Aspects of Test

Check the weights are in place and don’t let it fall too quickly.

Aims of Test

To improve the strength in my leg muscles.

Main Muscles Used

Biceps femoris, Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Achilles tendon.

Test Described

You put your feet on the panel, and then push as hard as you can. Change weight every time until you can’t do it. Write the highest one there is.

A Layout for My Muscles Endurance Programme

In this endurance programme I have decided that I am going to do a training circuit for my swimming. The whole point of this circuit is trying to improve my arm strength so that it could give me more power in my upper body to swim quicker. I am going to do this circuit for 6 week, and I will be doing it every Tuesday afternoon from 2:00pm – 4:00pm. The exercises that involve in the circuit training are: – Press up, Quick feet, Flys, Speedball, Sit up, Punch bag, Step and Skips. All these exercise will be done three times. I will be calculating each one, how many I have done within a minute. After doing one of the 1 minute exercise, I will be allow 1 minute of rest until the next exercise. I will be doing the same circuit every time (in the same order). By doing this, I hope that it have an affect on the improvement. I will be writing every exercise result down, which means I should have three tables per week. In the table will have exercise, description of the exercise, muscles involved and number of times I did within the minute. Although some of these exercise is not relate to any arm work, but you can’t only just train your arms because in swimming you will need to use your whole body to move.

Muscle endurance

-The ability of a muscle or group of muscles to sustain repeated contractions against a resistance for an extended period of time. Slow twitch muscle fibres will ensure they receive a rich supply of blood to enable the most efficient production of aerobic energy.

A test for muscular endurance will assess the ability of one muscle or muscle group to continue working repeatedly. A simple test to measure the endurance of the abdominal muscle group is the NCF abdominal conditioning test

Final Evaluation

Sumattive evaluation

My whole aim of this programme is to improve my arm strength and also to improve fitness at the same time. Although during the 3 week of the programme I had a small injury, which affected me doing any exercise related to arms and I was happy that I had it recovered by next week. The programme did help me to improve my aims. My arm strength has improved quiet a lot. Although in the 5 week I did really bad

Although the whole aim of the project did work very well in increasing my arms strength, but it still did improve some.

If I had more time to improve what I have done already, I certainly would increase the detail of the fitness test that I did. I will also add more heading like how external factors can affect me in sporting performance.

By add on extra time of training a day will increase the efficiency of the aim that I had, because I will have more time to train per day.

By changing the fitness that I am doing will also help other muscles and it might also motivate me because the old fitness training are getting board, I will start losing motivation so by giving a change it helps.

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