The Effects of Popular Culture on the Youth of Today Essay Sample

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Whenever one talks about culture, the speaker usually pertains to a way of life that has been molded in the course of time. Culture is encompasses of various belief systems, customs as well as principles that exist as a guide in a person’s day to day activities (Adorno 61; Brake 189; Strinati 226). This is most particularly evident in occasions wherein one is expected to socialize with one another. In certain situations, culture also exists to function as a framework or foundation in assessing or investigating the aesthetic and cultural significance of a specific article, incident or personality (Adorno; Anker and Schultze; Brake; Chalaby; Crane; Fiske; Grossberg; Purdy; Ross; Strinati). Due to the culture’s great value and contribution to society, culture is predisposed to signify or embody the historic accomplishments that the modern world has achieved for itself.

            Meanwhile, popular culture is normally remarked from a critical viewpoint. The rationale behind this is that popular culture has been generally labelled as the “inferior culture” mainly because it draws a huge magnitude of following. The mere fact that the term “popular” is used only suggests that it is a culture that has united a great deal of the population (Adorno 98; Anker and Schultze 1; Brake 39; Fiske 21; Strinati 1). Generally, popular culture may be best defined as the universal opinion or observation of the public. It has some traces of culture.  However, popular culture in this regard because of the modernity’s influence and brought about by globalization, gave a whole new meaning to certain facets of the core culture. In fashion citing for instance, different societies and groups have their distinct way of dressing up (Crane; Purdy 65). However, due to the exposure to other civilizations and culture, the fashion choices may ultimately transform and it may not of necessity mirror the core facets of culture as such.

            Globalization plays an important part in the spread of popular culture (Brake 189; Crane; Fiske 21; Strinati 226). The advanced technology as well as the mass media’s further growth and development has been recognized to work to the advantage of popular culture’s popularity principally in various cultures (Adorno 158; Anker and Schultze 1; Brake 39; Chalaby 457; Crane; Fiske 21; Grossberg 270; Strinati 58). Hollywood citing for instance, has quickly invaded and to a certain point – took over the Asian cinema (Adorno 98; Anker and Schultze 46; Brake 39; Chalaby 460; Crane; Fiske 21; Grossberg 270; Purdy 65; Ross; Strinati 1). Though there is truth to the claim that Hollywood is a leading force, Asian cinema are likely to modify certain aspects of western movies and adapt them to fit into the context of their respective cultures and backgrounds.

Music

            History shows that there had been particular variations in the improvement of different cultures of certain cultures as in the case of the blacks and the whites (Brake 189; Fiske 21; Ross).  Such cultural differences were told to have been present among several music industries and artists who were said to have acclaimed the cultural structure of the two cultures that is the whites and the blacks.  As history would have it, back in the 18th century, the music industry in the United States expected the production of the popular English music which was intended in the direction of the success of supremacy in the launch of the First World War, and this involved the printing and composition of songs which was found completed in the existing music establishments, the minstrel as well as the theatre halls (Adorno 98; Strinati 58).

The media and the pop culture in the United States has been in the forefront in educating members of the general public on significant social concerns spanning politics, illegal drugs, terrorism, and popular music to sports (Adorno 61; Brake 39; Chalaby 470; Fiske 21; Ross; Strinati 1). Aside from videos, films, and theatre plays and commercials in sports as well as in entertainment channels, songs have been written by some artists in an attempt to spread the particular messages to a targeted audience, for example the youth.  These songs are played over the radio and heard the world over (Chalaby 472; Ross; Strinati 58).

The emergence of popular music like hip-hop illustrate the link that connects popular culture and consumerism (Adorno 158; Anker and Schultze 1; Chalaby 472; Crane; Grossberg 270; Strinati 58). This musical genre is an instant scuccess to the Asian youth for instance. However, along with taking pleasure in hip-hop’s beat comes the strong influence to adapt the music’s fashion statement (Adorno 158; Anker and Schultze 1; Crane; Grossberg 270; Strinati 58). Accessorizing with some “bling-blings” is a essential as far as the hip-hop fashion is concerned. Branded baggy pants and skimpy clothing for women are also a must-have. In response, these individuals assemble and form their own hip-hop cluster or subcultures in which the aforementioned fashion choices are followed.

Social dealers have been attempting to have more people be knowledgeable of the basic of culture. In the United States, the central goal of the media organizations is to collect the musical works of artists who have made a fuss of in the pop culture and educate the general public (Adorno 158; Chalaby 472; Fiske 21; Ross; Strinati 1). Likewise, it seeks to protect the artistic legacy of the American culture (Adorno 61; Anker and Schultze 46; Brake 39; Chalaby 472; Crane; Ross; Strinati 226).

Citing for instance in the United States, various artists have written songs to support programs aimed to promote the pop culture (Ross; Strinati 58). These songs particularly those by famous artists in the country are found to be quite appealing to the general public. Similarly, the central government has also formulated certain rules which commands that all organizations even the media establishments and music artists assist in the attempt to uphold the American culture (Adorno 61; Brake 39; Chalaby 472; Fiske 21; Ross; Strinati 226).

Fashion

Fashion is one of the most essential elements of popular culture which influences the way of life of people and mirrors their individual personalities. Fashion as well as its trends aid in the study of popular culture echoing social transformation as well as society’s discernment of its people (Fiske 21; Purdy 65). Fashion is one of the most fascinating cultural facets for the reason that it mirrors the distinctiveness of a society and its independence.  Fashion includes clothes as well as the embellishment of the body to flaunt particular styles and to emphasize relationships that exists between the body and its societal identification (Fiske 21; Purdy 289). It aids to modify individual personality and denote sex and social distinctions. Following certain fashion craze and current styles of clothing may aid one to develop his distinctive individual representation of himself.

            As far as controlling image perception is concerned, fashion has created a considerable influence on the tastes as well as on the priorities of the contemporary society (Crane; Fiske 21; Purdy 65). It directs the movement of ideas on the subject of fashion and lifestyles, and decides what will be in vogue in terms of trends and lifestyles (Crane; Fiske 21; Purdy 289).  As for its relation to popular culture, fashion not more of a language than a narrow set of predetermined rules (Crane; Fiske 21; Purdy 65). To say differently, it is a shorthand manner of presenting position and individuality and a way of practicing social interaction.

Fashion mirrors American cultural standards and way of life, social interactions and human relations. As such as, in American culture fashion is a venue wherein people and groups are taught to be visually comfortable with themselves in their society (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 289). Taking into consideration the local trait of fashion, acculturation is not in any way a single-society practice. The development of shopper tastes has improved particular aspects of fashion related to the tradition of consumption (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 289). However, the position and importance of fashion as one facet of societal conduct has only undergone an insignificant alteration. Specific connotations differ traditionally and are culturally particular, because the policies, system and language of the clothing and the manner on which they are to be worn are exact and restricted in scope.

Some contemporary feminist pieces of literary and art analysis has employed features of analysis to the depiction of women, cultural fabrication, and popular culture (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 289). Citing for instance, the relative abandon of men’s fashion in various investigations of fashion is a result of the idiosyncrasy of American perceptions of gender (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 289). While techniques of femininity are gained and flaunted through clothing, physical appearance, and gestures, rules of masculinity are engraved through system of action, particularly through the rules of sport and contest. Consequently, where men’s fashion has been investigated, it has been nearly entirely in relation to sports fashion. In most cases, the cultural traits associated to the naked body and various arrangements of body-space relationships and system of acculturation support other codes of fashion (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 289).

Fashion is a fascinating facet of popular culture for the reason that it mirrors social relations and class position. Citing for example, the very evident role of (middleclass) women as the “social” face of family life that originated in the nineteenth century disappeared. A woman was currently seen as a custodian of her family’s wellbeing and happiness other than of its place in society (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 65). Such transformation was mirrored in the shifting foci of the subjects of household administration and etiquette manuals. Recommendation was currently presented on social etiquette, domestic aid, beauty, self-development, and fashion. Women’s bodies and not anymore their moral qualities developed into the currency by which success may be attained in various fields of interest.  Clothing and body silhouettes are the noticeable indicators of style (Crane; Fiske; Purdy 289).

Fashion as well as its influence on society is a controversial aspect for the reason that it concerns various agents and impacts external command over the mass market. Clothing are manufactured in large quantities and put up for sale at mass markets. Advancements in reprographic procedures and spreading out of the press allow fashion ideas to be circulated to a wide audience and huge market (Crane; Purdy 289). Fashion is being democratized and made accessible to a larger part of the population. On the other hand, fashion expansion and control of values and norms is often seen as a negative feature of fashion culture (Crane; Purdy 289).  By means of development of prominent imitation, young girls build a social facade from techniques of femininity counting body work outs, rules of dressing up, and adornment and mental processes obtained from the imitation of acquaintances, siblings, relatives, famous, print media, and television (Crane; Purdy 289).

Media

            Then again, if one would give another glimpse, Hollywood did not only inspire Asia’s film industry. At the same time as western films are regularly shown, the fashion and the moral standards that are depicted in these films are also being imparted to the audience (Adorno 158; Brake 139; Chalaby 472; Fiske 21; Ross; Strinati 1). A large number of the Asian youth have all of a sudden changed their selections when it comes to fashion choices. Many of them tend to mimic and welcome the Western style.

Popular culture is the most active motivating force behind the human understanding of society (Adorno 98; Brake; Chalaby 457; Fiske 21; Ross; Strinati 1).  Through it, people build up social hopes and afterwards project such hopes onto their neighbours.  In western society, one of the more satirical factors is the source of popular culture.

Popular culture’s depiction of American cities, members of certain social classes, customs, and historical events all have been greatly impacted by the media, particularly in the movies (Adorno 158; Chalaby 457; Ross).  Usually, Hollywood’s interpretations of certain facets of everyday life are taken as real adaptations, when if truth be told, they have embellished the truth, or simply exploited stereotypes.  The product of this is a twofold realism, one that is correct and direct, and one that is left to the imagination.

Bias philosophy is a natural element of the social world, except that in western culture, its influences are more evident in the movies as well as in television (Adorno 61; Anker and Schultze 46; Brake 39).  The media’s portrayal of racial groups, women and religious groups has a dynamic impact on the manner in which these groups are recognized in their respective communities, and the scheme behind such portrayals are as related to the general public as the stereotypes themselves (Adorno 61; Anker and Schultze 46; Brake 39).

The heroine in the movies has travelled far from the origin of the medium.  It can be disputed that this is an explicit manifestation of societal transformation.  The performing arts have grown from not permitting blacks, or women to act, to having minorities play lead roles (Adorno 61; Anker and Schultze 46; Brake 39).

All things considered, by means of gauging the media and film’s impact on popular culture, it becomes quite evident that there is really a minimal influence on the part of individuals to form this philosophy.  Similar circumstances remain in within society nearly subconsciously and they are unavoidable (Adorno 158; Brake 189; Chalaby 470; Ross; Strinati 226).  It is a normal inclination to take on the trait and speech patterns of those in one’s social cluster (Adorno 98; Brake 39; Chalaby 472).  This is the same way babies learn to express themselves.  Such reality is where self consciousness depends upon.

One’s real self can not be recognized by the words they speak, or even the trait they possess; the heart of one’s genuine self is separated from his preferred system of communication.  But still, in order for people to be comfortable with his surrounding, he ought to communicate with his neighbours in a manner where both messages come across, or to the very least with a common language.  This is why popular culture is so important, since it allows people to express ideals in a direct and subtly implied manner (Adorno 98; Brake 189; Fiske 21; Strinati 1).  People take on the principles of popular culture to present characters that they believe would aid them in their interactions.  The more movies and television break down restrictions and redefine social models, the more choices people have to represent.  Nevertheless, these are all still characteristics that are founded on fake characters (Adorno 61; Brake 189; Fiske; Strinati 226).  It is an inevitable process. One thing that has been easily influenced by globalization and popular culture for that matter is the way beauty and body image have been restructured and recreated. Even though it is right that beauty is subjective and that it has no general bases for assessment, it cannot be denied that popular culture has in one way or another established a criterion on how to make a distinction of something that is beautiful apart from something that is not.

Works Cited

Adorno, Theodor W. The Culture Industry: Selected Essays on Mass Culture. New York:

Routledge, 2001.

Anker, Roy M., Quentin James Schultze, Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, and

Lambert Zuidervaart. Dancing in the Dark: Youth, Popular Culture, and the Electronic Media. Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1991.

Brake, Mike. Comparative Youth Culture: The Sociology of Youth Culture and youth

subcultures in America, Britain, and Canada. New York: Routledge, 1990.

Chalaby, Jean K. Television for a New Global Order: Transitional Television Networks and

the Formation of Global Systems. Gazette 65 (2003): 457-472.

Crane, D. Fashion and Its Social Agendas: Class, Gender, and Identity in Clothing. Chicago:

University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Fiske, John. Understanding Popular Culture. New York: Routledge, 1989.

Grossberg, Lawrence. Dancing in Spite of Myself: Essays on Popular Culture. North

Carolina: Duke University Press, 1997.

Purdy, Daniel, L. The Rise of Fashion: A Reader. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota

Press, 2004.

Ross, Karen. Black and White Media: Black Images in Popular Film and Television.

Massachusetts: Polity Press, 1996.

Strinati, Dominic. An introduction to theories of popular culture. New York: Routledge,

2004.

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